The Answer Sheet: Dan Willingham


Posted at 11:55 AM ET, 10/04/2010

Willingham: How to teach collaboration

Cognitive scientist Daniel Willingham writes that “collaboration” and “working effectively in groups” are often deemed 21st century skills that young people must learn. But how to teach them? Researchers just made headway in characterizing what good group members do.

By Valerie Strauss  |  11:55 AM ET, 10/04/2010 |  Permalink  |  Comments ( 0)
Categories:  Higher Education, Higher Education, Higher Education, Higher Education, Higher Education | Tags:  21st century skills, collaboration, dan willingham, daniel willingham, how to teach collaboration, teaching 21st century skills, willingham, working in groups

Posted at 11:30 AM ET, 09/27/2010

Willingham: 'Superman' is entertainment, nothing more

Cognitive scientist Daniel Willingham says that in its quest for movie simplicity, "Waiting for Superman" Wa

By Valerie Strauss  |  11:30 AM ET, 09/27/2010 |  Permalink  |  Comments ( 0)
Categories:  Guest Bloggers, Guest Bloggers, Guest Bloggers | Tags:  back to the future, dan willingham, michael j. fox, school reform, waiting for superman

Posted at 01:14 PM ET, 06/28/2010

Willingham: Newsweek story on single-sex ed research misses mark

Cognitive scientist Daniel Willingham critiques a Newsweek article on single-sex education and how faithfully it represents research on the issue.

By Valerie Strauss  |  01:14 PM ET, 06/28/2010 |  Permalink  |  Comments ( 0)
Categories:  Guest Bloggers, Guest Bloggers, Guest Bloggers, Guest Bloggers | Tags:  dan willingham, daniel willingham, education research, newsweek, research and education, single-sex education, single-sex education and effectiveness.

Posted at 11:30 AM ET, 11/16/2009

Willingham: We have math standards, but now what?

We’ve got good standards . . . now what? . . .Students need conceptual knowledge. They need to understand why the procedures work, e.g., why “invert and multiply” yields the right answer when dividing fractions. Without conceptual knowledge, it is difficult to solve novel problems. The student can recognize that certain procedures apply to certain problem types, but if a problem is dressed up in a slightly different format, the student likely will be stumped. American students generally have adequate (not terrific) factual and procedural knowledge. Their conceptual knowledge is, on average, terrible.

By Valerie Strauss  |  11:30 AM ET, 11/16/2009 |  Permalink  |  Comments ( 0)
Categories:  Guest Bloggers, Guest Bloggers, Guest Bloggers | Tags:  Dan Willingham, math