The Fix: Election 2012

One single donation to Crossroads GPS in 2012: $22,500,000

One single donation to Crossroads GPS in 2012: $22,500,000

The ease with which money flowed into the coffers of conservative advocacy groups that sought to deny President Obama reelection is underscored in a draft tax filing for the twin Crossroads organizations that the Wall Street Journal got a peek at Thursday.

One single donor ponied up $22.5 million of the $180 million haul raised by the tax-exempt group Crossroads GPS in 2012. Because the organization is set up as a social welfare advocacy organization, not as a political committee, it is not required to disclose the names of its benefactors.

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What Mitt Romney learned about Chris Christie in 2012 and why it matters for 2016

What Mitt Romney learned about Chris Christie in 2012 and why it matters for 2016

When Mitt Romney went searching for a vice presidential running mate last year, he and his team gave New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie (R) a good long look. Two times. What they found is notable not just for what it says about 2012, but what it might also say about 2016.

The details surfaced in “Double Down,” a book about the 2012 campaign due to hit bookshelves Tuesday. In their account, authors Mark Halperin and John Heilemann describe a difficult vetting process in which Christie’s team provided incomplete information about a host of potential red flags pertaining to his record. Here’s why it all matters: Christie may run for president in 2016, and if he does, the media and his opponents could give some or all of the information fresh attention.

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Why Democrats should be worried about the youth vote

Why Democrats should be worried about the youth vote

It may seem like Democrats should be pretty happy with young voters. After all, President Obama twice won at least 60 percent of voters between the age of 18 and 29 -- outpacing all other presidential candidates spanning the last three decades.

But a closer look reveals some troubling signs for the party. Young voter turnout is nothing like it was in the 1980s and early 1990s. And the stagnation has been driven by an across-the-board disinterest among several demographic groups. It's a potential problem for Democrats, because we're talking about a slice of the electorate which has sided with the party during the last six presidential elections.

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The states with the highest and lowest turnout in 2012, in 2 charts

The states with the highest and lowest turnout in 2012, in 2 charts

Amid all of the uncertainty in politics, we know at least this much: Elections are all about turnout.

Which is why we were very excited to see a new and comprehensive study from Nonprofit Vote, a nonpartisan origination that works with nonprofits to encourage voter participation. The study, which you can read in its entirety on the group's Web site, includes a breakdown of 2012 turnout rates in all 50 states and the District. The percentages were calculated by dividing the number of ballots cast by the voting eligible population.

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Latinos didn't cost Mitt Romney the election

Republicans have a major Latino problem, but it didn't cost them the 2012 election.

According to a Fix review of election results, Mitt Romney would have needed to carry as much as 51 percent of the Hispanic vote in order to win the Electoral College -- a number no Republican presidential candidate on record has been able to attain and isn't really within the realm of possibility these days.

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The political year on Twitter, by the numbers

The political year on Twitter, by the numbers

On Tuesday, Twitter released lists of the top trending topics and tweets of 2012. The social networking Web site was a huge part of the 2012 election conversation, with politicians, the reporters who cover them, and voters increasingly relying on the medium for communication.

Below, we take a by-the-numbers look at the 2012 intersection of politics and Twitter, based off the data released on Tuesday:

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Nancy Pelosi's most memorable moments (VIDEO)

Nancy Pelosi's most memorable moments (VIDEO)

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (Calif.) announced Wednesday that she intends to remain at the headof the Democratic caucus in the next Congress. For Pelosi, it was only the latestnewsworthydevelopment in a career filled with them. Below, we look back at some of Pelosi's mostmemorablemoments. (What did we miss? The comments section awaits!)

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Tom Coburn: Republicans didnt explain to people what were for

One lesson of the 2012 election is that Republicans must do a better job of explaining what the GOP stands for, Sen. Tom Coburn (R-Okla.) said Sunday morning.

We didn't sell a positive vision, Coburn said on NBC's Meet The Press when asked about recently concluded election cycle. We didn't explain to people what we're for.

In addition to President Obama winning reelection on Tuesday, Democrats paddedtheirSenate majority and appeared on pace to make slight gains in the House, though the GOP still controls the lower chamber.

You have to demonstrate what you are for not what you are against, Coburn said.

Stephen Colbert: Could the Nor’easter hurt Romneys momentum? (video)

Could Wednesday's nor'easter be hurting Mitt Romney politically? Comedy Central's Stephen Colbert expressed his worry on "The Colbert Report" Thursday night.

"I'm afraid that this new storm could hurt Romney'smomentum," Colbert said. "It could slow him down. I mean, he already lost the election -- that can't help him. But of course Florida is still being counted."

Watch the full clip below.

The biggest surprises of Election Day 2012

The biggest surprises of Election Day 2012

It's all over except for the shouting (and except where it's not over).

But did anything really surprise us on Tuesday? On the macro: Not really. Both chambers of Congress remained about as-is, and the presidency stayed with Barack Obama -- about like we had predicted.

But inside that big picture are a bunch of little Waldos that we thought were worth a closer look.

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John Sununus not-so-greatest hits (VIDEO)

John Sununus not-so-greatest hits (VIDEO)

When John H. Sununu suggested Thursday night that Colin Powell endorsed President Obama because both are African American (he later backpedaled), he stoked controversy for what seemed like the umpteenth time this election cycle.

Sununu, a former New Hampshire governor and White House chief of staff under President George H.W. Bush, has been one of Mitt Romneys most active surrogates. Hes embraced the role of attack dog, lambasting Obama at every turn, from cable news interviews to conference calls with reporters. Along the way, his brash, outspoken manner has gotten him into some hot water. Heres a look back at some Sununu comments that have turned heads this election season.

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Post-ABC tracking poll: Obama 49 percent, Romney 48 percent

Post-ABC tracking poll: Obama 49 percent, Romney 48 percent

President Obama and Mitt Romney head into the final debate still deadlocked among likely voters nationally: 49 percent side with the Democratic president, 48 percent with the Republican challenger, according to a new Washington Post-ABC News poll.

( WATCH: Live streaming video of the debate )



But Romney now rivals Obama when it comes to dealing with international affairs and terrorism, leveling the playing field heading into Monday’s debate on foreign policy. Romney also runs about evenly with the president as voters’ pick who is the better commander-in-chief.

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How party ID explains Romney’s “surge”

New numbers from Gallup and the Pew Research Center showing the presidential contest tied among all voters in recent days are sure to buoy Republican hopes that Mitt Romney did more than win a debate last week. But the newly released data also undercut a persistent criticism of election polls: that there is a “true” measure of partisan identification — and its malicious corollary, that pollsters are manipulating reality.

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Most are negative about Mitt Romney’s “47 percent” comments

A majority of Americans have unfavorable views of former Massachusetts governor Mitt Romney’s comments — caught on film at a fundraiser — regarding the “47 percent” of people who don’t pay federal income taxes and simply would not vote for him, according to a new Washington Post-ABC News poll

Fifty-four percent of those polled regarded Romney’s comments in an unfavorable light while 32 percent saw them favorable. The public reaction to the comments is, not surprisingly this close to an election, a partisan one. More than three-quarters of Democrats have negative impressions of Romney’s comments, with most having “strongly unfavorable” views. Independents too tilt negative by more than 2 to 1: 57 to 27 percent. (Among Republicans, nearly two-thirds have favorable views of Romney’s comments.)

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Fix Veep Pick ‘Em Contest

Fix Veep Pick ‘Em Contest

Wisconsin Rep. Paul Ryan was only the fourth most popular pick among Fix readers in the Veepstakes pick ’em pool we ran last month.

High-fives all around for the Fix Veepstakes pick ‘em contest winners.

Sens. Marco Rubio (Fl.) and Rob Portman (Ohio) and former Minnesota Gov. Tim Pawlenty were all favored over Ryan in our informal poll, and no o ne correctly guessed Ryan would be named to the ticket on Aug. 11.

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A silver lining in May jobs report for President Obama

A silver lining in May jobs report for President Obama

President Obama continues to struggle to recover politically from a disastrous May jobs report that showed that just 69,000 jobs were created in the month while the national unemployment rate ticked up to 8.2 percent.

Obama and his campaign team have spent much of the two and a half weeks since the release of the jobs report fighting back against chatter — much of it from within their own party — that the president badly needs a course correction when it comes to his economic messaging.

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Republicans stand by Vern Buchanan

Republicans stand by Vern Buchanan

Three-term Republican Rep. Vern Buchanan (R-Fla.) is making headlines for his fundraising — and not in a good way.

A federal grand jury in Florida is looking at allegations that Buchanan, the vice chairman of finance for the National Republican Congressional Committee, broke the law by reimbursing donors to his political campaigns. FBI and IRS agents have contacted former employees of Buchanan’s car dealership network who allege financial wrongdoing.

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Specter scoffs at Santorum's endorsement claim

Former Pennsylvania senator Arlen Specter said Thursday that Rick Santorum got his facts wrong when he said that he endorsed Specter only after securing a promise that Specter would support GOP Supreme Court nominees.


Arlen Specter (CHARLES DHARAPAK - AP)

At Wednesday night's debate in Arizona, Santorum (as he is often forced to do) defended his 2004 endorsement of Specter. Specter at the time was a moderate Republican facing a conservative primary challenge, and the GOP stood by its incumbent, feeling he had the best chance to win in a nominally blue state.

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Newt Gingrich ad suggests America could become Cuba

In a new Spanish-language ad, former House speaker Newt Gingrich suggests — through Cuban-American speakers — that President Obama is headed down the same path as Fidel Castro.

“My parents came to America looking for freedom and opportunity, and now America is starting to look like the country my parents fled,” says a young man in the English version of the ad.

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