The Fix: New York

The Fix’s Colorado and New York election prediction contest winner!

The Colorado recall campaign is in the history books. So is the New York mayoral primary.

Fix reader “richwig” made some history too, winning The Fix’s election prediction contest!


Bill de Blasio celebrates his first-place finish on election night. (Kathy Willens/AP)

“Richwig” correctly predicted the recall of both Democratic state senators in Colorado and pegged Public Advocate Bill de Blasio (39 percent) as the winner of the New York Democratic mayoral primary, with former comptroller Bill Thompson (25 percent) coming in second. That was pretty close to the final tally, which showed de Blasio winning with 40.3 percent and Thompson taking second place with 26.2 percent.

If you are “richwig,” e-mail Chris.Cillizza@washpost.com to claim your prize. You get a choice — either a “Politics and Pints” pint glass (warning, an image of The Fix’s head is on the glass) or a signed copy of “The Gospel According to The Fix.”

Thanks to everyone who participated!

Five things to watch on Election Day in New York and Colorado

Five things to watch on Election Day in New York and Colorado

Note: We originally posted this item on Monday, 9/9. We are re-posting it today as voters go to the polls.

Voters head to the polls in New York and Colorado on Tuesday to cast ballots in some high-stakes races that are not to be missed. From fresh clarity about the gun control debate to whittling down the possibilities of who will get the top job in America’s most populous city, here are the five biggest things to watch:

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The rise of Bill de Blasio and fall of Anthony Weiner in 1 chart

We flagged a new Quinnipiac University survey over on Post Politics earlier that shows New York City Public Advocate Bill de Blasio not only leading the Democratic mayoral field by a wide margin, but on the verge of avoiding a runoff.

It’s a pretty remarkable rise for a candidate that once looked to have little chance of winning.

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Five things to know about Bill de Blasio

Five things to know about Bill de Blasio

New York City Public Advocate Bill de Blasio has climbed to the top of the latest poll in the city's turbulent campaign for the Democratic mayoral nomination. With less than a month to go before the primary, he leads the pack with 30 percent support, the most recent Quinnipiac University survey shows.

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Eliot Spitzer is unpopular. But he could still win.

Eliot Spitzer is unpopular. But he could still win.

Eliot Spitzer isn't exactly Mr. Popularity, and that should come as no surprise. But believe it or not, he could still win his campaign for New York City comptroller.

A new Siena College poll released Monday is filled with discouraging news for Spitzer. Sixty-eight percent of New York State voters view Spitzer's and Anthony Weiner's comeback bids as "embarrassing" for the state, while 16 percent say it's no big deal, and 8 percent say they find it entertaining.

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Eliot Spitzer's populist push, and why it just might work

Eliot Spitzer's populist push, and why it just might work

Eliot Spitzer's new ad campaign is all about you.

It's a smart stroke of populism for a candidate for New York City comptroller weighed down by a prostitution scandal that forced him to resign as governor in 2008.

In a pair of new ads first reported by CNN's Peter Hamby Wednesday, Spitzer makes a pitch for votes not on the basis of likability, relatablity or charisma. He's not going to win that battle, and he knows it. So Spitzer goes at it another way, with an effort to make the contest less about him personally and more about voters.

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How Anthony Weiner went from spectacle to just plain sad

How Anthony Weiner went from spectacle to just plain sad

The Fix loves political spectacle. The theater of politics is what draws us to it -- politicians acting on a grand stage with genuinely important consequences for the future of the country.

So, when Anthony Weiner -- he of the junk shots that drove him from Congress in 2011 -- announced that he was running for mayor of New York City this fall, we were skeptical but intrigued.

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Did Huma Abedin's appearance with Anthony Weiner matter? Maybe not.

Did Huma Abedin's appearance with Anthony Weiner matter? Maybe not.

Perhaps the most striking part of Anthony Weiner's news conference Tuesday was that he wasn't the only one who spoke. Weiner's wife, Huma Abedin, vouched for her husband in no uncertain terms, after he acknowledged that he engaged in sexually explicit online conversations even after resigning from Congress.

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Eliot Spitzer isn't sorry. Not really.

Eliot Spitzer isn't sorry. Not really.

The first thing Eliot Spitzer wants you to know is that he's sorry.

"I have spent five years reflecting, thinking, apologizing, and I am ready to ask forgiveness," Spitzer, the disgraced former governor, told the hosts of MSNBC's "Morning Joe" this morning when questioned about the prostitution scandal that led to his resignation in 2008.

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Anthony Weiner's rocky restart

Anthony Weiner's rocky restart

Anthony Weiner announced late Tuesday that he would run for mayor of New York. He's received a lot of attention in his first few days back in politics. But much of it hasn't been the good kind.

Since kicking off his bid for political redemption, the former congressman, who resigned from the House after sending lewd photos to women online has quickly run into some speed bumps.

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Anthony Weiner is running for mayor of New York City. But, can he win? And does it even matter?

Anthony Weiner is running for mayor of New York City. But, can he win? And does it even matter?

While you were sleeping, Anthony Weiner was announcing his decision to run for mayor of New York City this year.

Now that the debate over whether or not he will run is over, the one question that remains is this: Can Weiner maybe, possibly, holy-cow-are-we-seriously-talking-about-this win?

Short answer: Almost certainly not. Long answer: Almost certainly not but that doesn't mean he can't/won't impact the contest.

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Anthony Weiner for New York City Mayor: Pipe dream or possibility?

Anthony Weiner for New York City Mayor: Pipe dream or possibility?

Now that former congresman Anthony Weiner has made clear he is looking seriously at running for mayor of New York City later this year, the next obvious question is: Would he actually stand a chance of being elected?

This is the same Weiner, after all, who was run from Congress after photos of his, um, privates, emerged online in 2011. That Weiner was sending photos to women he never met while his wife, longtime Clinton aide Huma Abedin, was pregnant with the couple's first child made it even worse -- if that's possible. (Odd fact: Weiner is the only person to win our "Worst Week in Washington" award four times.)

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Cuomo's logical (but risky) late-term abortion push

Cuomo's logical (but risky) late-term abortion push

Andrew Cuomo, who has been unafraid to make a splash during his time as governor of New York, is doing it again.

The New York Times reported over the weekend that the Democrat is set to push for a bill that would reduce the state's restrictions on late-term abortions, allowing for the procedure when the woman's health is at stake rather than just, as current law states, when her life is in danger -- a significantly lower threshold.

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Where the big donors come from (and where they don’t), in one chart

Where the big donors come from (and where they don’t), in one chart

The voters who will decide the next president come from swing states, but the big donors who largely fund the presidential campaigns don’t.

According to the handy graphic below from the nonpartisan fundraising Web site Rally.org, the five places with the biggest average donation are all highly noncompetitive at the presidential level: Connecticut, the District of Columbia, Massachusetts, New York and — wait for it — Wyoming (?).

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Anthony Weiner’s comeback: How soon is too soon?

Just 13 months after succumbing to scandal that involved pictures of his crotch being broadcast for the world to see and repeated lies about it, those close to former congressman Anthony Weiner (D-N.Y.) are already talking about a comeback.
Rep. Anthony Weiner (D-N.Y.) speaks to the media regarding a lewd photo tweet May 31, 2011, on Capitol Hill. (Alex Wong/Getty Images)

The New York Post got the ball rolling on the chatter this weekend, and the New York Times followed with a story Monday citing Weiner’s friends, who said he was weighing his options when it comes to a run for either New York City public advocate or even mayor in 2013.

Nobody doubts that politicians can overcome scandals involving sex and lies; we’ve seen it at the highest levels (Bill Clinton, anyone?).

But the question for Weiner is how soon is too soon.

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Charlie Rangel wins (again)

New York state Sen. Adriano Espaillat (D) conceded to Rep. Charlie Rangel (D-N.Y.) for the second time on Monday, bringing an end to a two-week-old drama over Rangel’s primary win.

A final count of the votes over the weekend showed Rangel leading Espaillat by 990 votes — more than 2 percent of votes cast in the Democratic primary and well outside the margin for a recount.
Congressman Charles Rangel arrives to supporters at his campaign headquarters after polls have closed in his race for the Democratic primary challenge in New York's 15th congressional district on June 26, 2012 in New York City. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

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Rangel opponent files for re-vote in increasingly tight primary

What at one point looked like a big primary night victory for Rep. Charlie Rangel (D-N.Y.) has gradually become a close race — enough so that Rangel’s opponent is now filing for a possible do-over election.

State Sen. Adriano Espaillat this week filed with the state Supreme Court seeking either a recount or a highly unusual redo of his June 26 primary with Rangel. Espaillat has lodged accusations of voter suppression and has pointed to faulty administration and vote-counting by New York City elections officials.


Rep. Charles Rangel, D-N.Y., salutes surviving members of the Montford Point Marines, during a Congressional Gold Medal ceremony at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, Wednesday, June 27, 2012. (Pablo Martinez Monsivais — Associated Press)

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New York primary results: Rangel survives

Updated at 11:53 p.m.

Rep. Charles Rangel (D-N.Y.) has won the Democratic nomination in his Harlem-based district, paving the way for a 22nd term in Congress as he turned aside a crowded primary field Tuesday.

With 84 percent of precincts reporting, Rangel led state Sen. Adriano Espaillat 45 percent to 40 percent. The AP has called the race for Rangel.

In his victory, Rangel overcomes both health problems that had some speculating he was on his deathbed and a district that took in plenty of Latino territory in redistricting. It’s the second-straight election in which he has withstood a competitive primary.

Also in New York City, New York state Assemblyman Hakeem Jeffries easily turned aside primary opponent and controversial New York City Councilman Charles Barron on Tuesday and is a shoo-in to replace retiring Rep. Ed Towns (D-N.Y.) in November.

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Rep. Edolphus Towns, a New York Democrat, won’t seek reelection

Fifteen-term Rep. Edolphus Towns (D-N.Y.) has decided not to seek reelection this year, according to two aides familiar with his plans.

Towns, who represents a heavily Democratic and majority-black Brooklyn-based district and is a former chairman of the House Oversight and Government Reform committee, will turn 78 this year and would have been 80 by the time his next term ended. In addition, he faced a potentially difficult primary with state Assemblyman Hakeem Jeffries and New York City Councilman Charles Barron.

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New York Rep. Gary Ackerman to retire

Rep. Gary Ackerman (D-N.Y.) announced Thursday that he will not seek reelection this year.

“I’ve been truly privileged to have had the opportunity to fight for the beliefs of my neighbors in both the state capital and in the halls of Congress,” Ackerman said in a statement. “During my years in Congress, it has been my pleasure to address the needs of thousands of individual constituents and to influence domestic and global policy while serving on the Financial and Foreign Affairs Committees in the House. I am most thankful for the opportunity I’ve had to serve my country and my community.”

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New York GOP Rep. Bob Turner to run for Senate

Rep. Bob Turner (R-N.Y.) announced Tuesday that he will seek the Republican nomination to face Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand (D-N.Y.) this year.


Rep. Bob Turner (Spencer Platt - GETTY IMAGES)

“I will travel to the Republican State Convention in Rochester later this week and humbly ask for the Republican nomination for the United States Senate,” Turner said in a statement, adding: “I have made my intentions known to the other Republican candidates in this race.”

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NY Dem Rep. Joe Crowley: “I had a good day yesterday in Queens”

NY Dem Rep. Joe Crowley: “I had a good day yesterday in Queens”

Washington Post Style reporter Jason Horowitz is a New York City native. He also spent several years writing for the New York Observer. He filed a guest post for The Fix on Rep. Joe Crowley’s (D) reaction to Rep. Bob Turner’s (R) win in New York’s 9th district on Tuesday.

The humiliating defeat of his hand-picked candidate in the Democratic 9th district did not prevent Rep. Joe Crowley, the boss of the Queens Democratic machine, from claiming victory on Wednesday afternoon.

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The New York special election: Will Democrats panic?

In the wake of Rep.-elect Bob Turner’s (R) upset victory in the special election in New York’s 9th district on Tuesday night, the prevailing question among Democrats will almost certainly be: Is it time to push the panic button?


(Rep.-elect Bob Turner (R) celebrates his win in New York’s 9th district special election Tuesday night.)
There’s little debate that the seat that will now occupied by Turner was one Democrats could have and should have won. It had been in Democratic hands for more than eight decades and was carried by President Obama by 11 points in 2008. And Democrats had a three-to-one registration advantage in the district.

Why they didn’t win is a matter of debate, but expect the after-action analysis to focus on the fact that Republicans (and former Democratic New York City mayor Ed Koch, who endorsed Turner) cast the race as a referendum on Obama.

That perception, which national Democratic leaders will do everything they can to beat back today, is a dangerous one for already-skittish Democrats concerned about how the still-staggering economy and the president’s unpopularity will impact them next fall.

It’s compounded by the fact that Democrats came nowhere close to winning another House special election in Nevada on Tuesday. At one point party strategists had seen a path to victory there too.

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What’s at stake in the New York special election?

The special election to replace disgraced former Rep. Anthony Weiner (D) in a Brooklyn-Queens House seat wasn’t supposed to be close.


The resignation of former U.S. Rep. Anthony Weiner has caused a competitive special election to replace him in New York’s 9th district. (AP Photo/Richard Drew)
After all, this is a seat long held by Democrats — including the likes of now Sen. Chuck Schumer and former Rep. Liz Holtzman — and one that President Obama carried by 11 points just three years ago.

But, all sides now agree that today’s contest between state Assemblyman David Weprin (D) and businessman Bob Turner (R) is a nip-and-tuck affair with Democrats privately pessimistic about their chances. (Make sure to offer your own guess on the outcome in our Fix prediction contest.)

So what does the tightness of the race — and the possibility of a Turner upset — tell us about the political landscape?

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Special elections reveal a fickle electorate

Republicans are citing their momentum in two special elections being held Tuesday as evidence that the national political environment has shifted against Democrats and President Obama.


Assemblyman David Weprin is in a surprisingly close race for a House seat in New York. (Ken Goldfield - AP Photo)
Four months ago, Democrats made the same argument about the GOP’s liabilities during their own win in an upstate New York special election.

And they are both right. Kind of.

The two competing storylines coming out of very different special elections just 130 days apart shows just how fickle American voters are right now.

They also demonstrate that any Republican momentum should be seen as momentary, and that the electorate four months hence could just as well revert back to punishing Republicans.

Meanwhile, all eyes Tuesday will be on whether the GOP can truly steal the seat of former congressman Anthony Weiner (D-N.Y.) and keep that of now-Sen. Dean Heller (R-Nev.).

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