The Fix: Occupy Wall Street

Is Occupy Wall Street late to the game?

Occupy Wall Street protesters across the country are giving big business a hard time, but a new poll suggests they might have missed their window.

With Wall Street’s foibles in the latter part of last decade starting to fade a bit from memory, Americans are increasingly likely to attribute the country’s problems to big government rather than big business, according to a new Gallup poll.
Occupy Wall Street activists march during a tour of foreclosed homes in the East New York neighborhood of the Brooklyn borough of New York last week. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer)

The poll shows 64 percent of Americans say “big government” is the biggest threat to the country, while just 26 percent say it’s “big business” and 8 percent say it’s “big labor.”

That figure for big business is about as low as it was before the economy collapsed in 2008, and those who say big government is the biggest threat is near a historic high.

Which suggests that the tea party might well have beaten Occupy Wall Street to the punch after the economic collapse, and that Occupy Wall Street might have missed its best chance to really catch fire.

Continue Reading »

How evictions could help — or hurt — Occupy Wall Street

How evictions could help — or hurt — Occupy Wall Street

Early this morning, police in New York forcibly evicted Occupy Wall Street protesters from their encampment in Zuccotti Park.

The move followed Occupy evictions across the country. Over the past few days, they were removed from parks in Albany, Chapel Hill, Denver, Oakland, Portland and Salt Lake City. Philadelphia Mayor Michael Nutter, who had previously been cooperative with protesters, said Sunday that “we’re re-evaluating our entire relationship.”

Continue Reading »

Occupy movement could be damaged by violent clashes

Occupy movement could be damaged by violent clashes

New Post polling shows the Occupy Wall Street movement could be a boon for Democrats in 2012. But violent clashes with the police at Occupy Oakland, along with arrests elsewhere, raise questions about how long the movement can last — and whether its message will be muddled by violence.

As police start ousting protesters, a disparate movement — one that has been embraced by many Democratic politicians and labor organizations — is struggling to respond.

Continue Reading »

How the Occupy Wall Street movement could help Democrats

The Occupy Wall Street movement is very much in its infancy, and many Americans still don’t know what to think of it. But there is also growing evidence that it could become a boon to Democrats.

A new CBS News-New York Times poll shows 43 percent of people agree with the aims of the movement, while just 27 percent say they disagree.
Occupy Wall Street demonstrator Dan Bulleti holds a sign in Zuccotti Park along with members of the Occupy Wall Street movement before they marched to the Brooklyn Bridge early this month. (Mario Tama/Getty Images)

That’s a good start, and if the movement can help turn the 2012 election into a populist uprising against the moneyed classes, it could play right into Democratic hands — particularly at a time when the Democrats need more enthusiasm.

Continue Reading »

Is Occupy Wall Street overblown?

Is Occupy Wall Street overblown?

Just how closely is the American public watching the ongoing “Occupy Wall Street” protests going on in New York City and around the country? Not very, according to new data from the Pew Research Center.

Just 17 percent said they were following the protests “very closely”. Independents — at 19 percent — were keeping the closest eye on the “Occupy” efforts while just 12 percent of Republicans did the same.

Continue Reading »

Afternoon Fix: Carney, Cantor spar on ‘Occupy Wall Street’

White House calls Eric Cantor hypocritical on Wall Street protests, Mitt Romney says his wife tells him he’s less awkward than he used to be, and another Democrat has dropped out in Massachusetts.

Make sure to sign up to get “Afternoon Fix” in your e-mail inbox every day by 5 (ish) p.m.!

Continue Reading »

Afternoon Fix: Cain says ‘If you’re not rich, blame yourself’

Herman Cain is not going to occupy Wall Street, a former McCain aide based a mentally ill character in her book on Sarah Palin, Gabrielle Giffords is headed back to Washington and Hoekstra raised a million.

Make sure to sign up to get “Afternoon Fix” in your e-mail inbox every day by 5 (ish) p.m.!

Continue Reading »

Professional left hopes ‘Occupy Wall Street’ not the end

The ‘Occupy Wall Street’ protest movement is already being described as a liberal tea party movement. Unions have quickly endorsed and pledged to join the protesters, but they also want this momentum to spill over into their own activism. Whether it will is unclear.

For months, former Obama administration official Van Jones has been trying to rally liberals under a common banner, one that could counter the tea party. The American Dream Movement was created, and a contract or legislative platform was born, with input from hundreds of thousands.Yet since its launch, the liberal contract has gotten little attention outside the groups involved in writing it.

Continue Reading »

Occupy Wall Street protests, yet another sign of voter frustration?

Occupy Wall Street protests, yet another sign of voter frustration?

The rising protests in America’s financial sectors — known, broadly, as “Occupy Wall Street — are the latest tangible evidence of the American public’s growing distrust and frustration with the major institutional pillars of the country.

While the “Occupy Wall Street” movement lacks a specific set of commonly-held beliefs, the protesters are united in anger against what they perceive to be a sense that America — and its priorities — are off track.

Continue Reading »