The Fix: Social

The Florida special election is tonight. Here are 8 people you need to follow on Twitter.

The most-watched special election of 2014 concludes tonight in Florida's 13th district.


(ILLUSTRATION) An illustration dated 12 April 2013 shows the display of a smartphone with the app logos of various social media plattforms in Schwerin, Germany. Facebook has been losing users for a while, but services such as Snapchat, Tumblr, Twitter and Vine are becoming more popular. Photo by: Jens B ttner/picture-alliance/dpa/AP Images

Want to follow all of the action as it happens? We asked Fix readers for the best people to follow on Twitter to stay up-to-date on the race throughout the night. You can follow their suggestions all with one click here or just watch the tweets come in below.

Tweets from https://twitter.com/TheFix/fl-13-special-election
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Why NASA doesn't have a Chris Hadfield

Why NASA doesn't have a Chris Hadfield

This item has been updated and corrected.

Canadian astronaut Chris Hadfield produced a stunning music video tribute to David Bowie's "Space Oddity" aboard the International Space Station before returning to Earth this week. It's a genuine Internet hit with an awesome backdrop to boot.

Hadfield, 53, combined his social media popularity, the skills of his Web-savvy son, Evan, and the full support of the Canadian Space Agency to shoot and produce a video seen in recent days by more than 7 million people.

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Facebook isn't liberal

Facebook isn't liberal

Liberal groups are currently boycotting Facebook in outrage over ads, funded by an advocacy group launched by founder Mark Zuckerberg, that cheer oil drilling and disparage health-care reform.

A freeze on ads from a handful of advocacy groups is unlikely to have much impact on Facebook's revenue. But the anger on the left directed at Zuckerberg does expose a popular misconception: That the young billionaire is one of them. In fact, there's not much evidence that he is much of a political animal -- for either party.

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Obama budget starts underwater with public

Obama budget starts underwater with public

President Obama's courtship of Republicans hit a critical point last week when he unveiled a budget proposal pitched as an effort at compromise. But a new Washington Post-ABC News poll finds Americans' initial reactions to the framework tilting negative, with broad opposition from Republicans and little public support for a key idea to reduce increases in Social Security payments.

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Club For Growth asks NRCC head to 'clarify' chained CPI remarks

Is America becoming more socially liberal?

Is America becoming more socially liberal?

Social issues worked in President Obama's favor on Election Day -- the same day that multiple states voted for the first time to legalize both gay marriage and recreational marijuana.

And that confluence has some suggesting the country is shifting to the left on social issues.

But it's really too early to say that.

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Jeb Bush and the politics of immigration

Jeb Bushs message on immigration is directed as much at his own party as it is at the opposing one. And if there is a GOP migration toward moderation on the subject in the coming years, he might well be at the forefront of the movement.

The former Florida Republican governor spoke at a Washington Post/Bloomberg breakfast in Tampa on Thursday morning, and said that while he does not favor President Obama’s recent executive order which stopped the deportation of certain young illegal immigrants, he does supportthe DREAM Act, a measure stalled in Congress which would grant legal residency and a path to citizenship for young people brought into the country illegally in their youth.Having a solution to the fact that we have all of these young people, many of whom are making great contributions, don’t have a connection to their to their parents’ former country, yeah, of course I’m for it, Bush said.Immigration has been a tricky issue for the GOP, which is populated with political figures who have adopted strict, hard-line postures that some in the moderate wing of the party worry will alienate a fast-growing Hispanic population that could play an increasingly influential role in electoral politics.Bush offered a warning for immigration hard-liners: Their message is not a winner.The interesting thing is that the most vociferous anti-immigrant kind of candidates lose. Probably have noticed, but they lose in primaries, they lose in general elections, he said.For Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney, immigration has been a difficult issue to navigate. The conservative base of the GOP opposes a path to citizenship for illegal immigrants. At the same time, Romney cant afford to alienate Hispanic voters. So, he has largely refrained from saying much about it.Earlier this year, Bush urged Romney to broaden his message when it comes to immigration, and to make it an economic issue as much as it is a question of the rule of law.When it comes to Hispanic voters, Bush said the issues that are atop the minds of other voters jobs and the economy are also the ones they care most about. But immigration is still important, Bush said Thursday, because addressing it is one way of building credibility with the Hispanic community.Its a gateway issue, because it’s an issue that allows you … show some sensitivity, it allows you to be heard, he said. And I think that’s kind of theright way to look at it, that it’s,it’s an issue that has relevance.Bush also offered a stern rebuke to Obama on immigration, and accused him of playing politics. Earlier this summer, the president signed an executive order that stopped the deportation of certain young illegal immigrants. Bush said he saw Obamas action as a way of undercutting Romney and winning good will from Hispanic voters, not as an effective piece of policy.This is so cynical. And he I mean, if you’re,if you,if the law says clearly that you have a case-by-case right to review cases, and you blanket say 800,000 people comply, that is way beyond the purview of executive power, Bushsaid.Bush will address the convention Thursday night. Hes a popular figure in Republican circles, owing to his appeal to the party establishment as well as conservatives, who like his focus on education reform. Immigration has not been a dominant topic of discussion so far at the gathering, and it will be interesting to see how much (if any) of his speech Bush devotes to the topic.I’m not running for anything and I can speak my mind, Bush said at the end of the Thursday morning breakfast.That may be the case right now. But he was mentioned as a possible presidential candidate this cycle and can reasonably expect his name to surface again in future elections.

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Todd Akin, GOP Senate candidate: ‘Legitimate rape’ rarely causes pregnancy

Todd Akin, GOP Senate candidate: ‘Legitimate rape’ rarely causes pregnancy

Last updated at 9:02 p.m. with the Romney campaign’s response.

Rep. Todd Akin, the newly-christened GOP Senate nominee in Missouri, said in an interview airing Sunday that “legitimate rape” rarely causes pregnancy.

Explaining his no-exceptions policy on abortions, Akin was asked why he opposes abortion even when the pregnancy is the result of rape.

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Like Angry Birds? You’re a swing voter.

Ever wonder what sites we tend to visit most frequently on the Internet — you know, the series of tubes — say about our political leanings? Us too.

Now we have some answers thanks to a very cool project from Engage DC, a Republican consulting company with a digital focus.

The chart, a bigger version of which you can see here, is absolutely fascinating. (For more on the methodology, scroll to the bottom of this post.)

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Romney app misspells ‘Amercia’

Mitt Romney’s presidential campaign misspelled the word “America” on its new iPhone app, and it’s already paying a price for it.

In the app, the phrase “A Better America” is misspelled “A Better Amercia.” The misspelling was picked up and tweeted widely Tuesday night, soon spawned a hashtag-driven Twitter meme in which people imagined just what Amercia stood for and what kind of policies Romney had planned for Amercia.

The Romney campaign told The Fix that it had submitted a corrected version of the app to Apple, which has to approve the update.

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The best political Tumblrs

The best political Tumblrs

Tumblr is a new thing in the political world.

Even the most tech-savvy campaigns are still learning about this rapidly-growing blogging tool.

Take Stephanie Cutter, the deputy campaign manager for President Obama’s reelection bid, who in a web video released earlier this week had this to say about Tumblr: “I keep hearing about Tumblr. Whatever that is, please use it too.”

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Arizona re-ignites contraception controversy

Osama plotted to kill Obama; Romney returning to Illinois; behind the scenes at a freshman GOP fundraiser; and a new contraception controversy in Arizona.

Make sure to sign up to get “Afternoon Fix” in your e-mail inbox every day by 5 (ish) p.m!

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Contraception issue fought to a draw

The Obama administration’s decision on Catholic institutions and contraception may have rekindled the social issue debate in American politics — particularly in the GOP primary.

But polling suggests the two sides have essentially fought to a draw.

While polling released before the issue became so hot-button showed a majority of Americans supported requiring all employers to require contraception coverage, a new poll from the Pew Research Center suggests that Americans are much more evenly split when it comes to religious institutions.

Furthermore, new Gallup poll previewed by The Post’s Greg Sargent shows President Obama’s numbers among Catholics remain basically unchanged.

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The White House’s convenient contraception controversy

The White House’s decision to force Catholic hospitals to dispense emergency contraception was a hot topic at the Conservative Political Action Conference on Thursday.

And that’s probably AOK with the Obama campaign.
Republican presidential candidate and former Pennsylvania senator Rick Santorum speaks at Oral Roberts University on Thursday in Tulsa, Okla. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)

For a White House that has often been accused of trying to undermine Mitt Romney in the Republican presidential race, the contraception debate is perhaps its happiest accident in that quest.

After all, while the issue hasn’t exactly been fun to deal with for the White House, what better way to help a social conservative like Rick Santorum in his quest to bring down Romney?

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