AJ Chavar
Video Journalist

AJ Chavar is a videojournalist for The Washington Post. Prior to joining the video team in September 2010 AJ was a student at Syracuse University, studying photojournalism, information technology and religion. After graduating in May 2010 AJ documented veterans’ issues in rural Washington State through collaborative multimedia as a fellow with the Carnegie-Knight News21 Program. AJ returned to the Washington Post after interning in the multimedia department in 2008, and contributing to the Post’s coverage of President Obama’s inauguration in early 2009. His work has been recognized by the 2010 College Photographer of the Year competition, as well as the Society of Professional Journalists.

Featured Work

Shooting back: C-Webb’s crusade against gun violence

Shooting back: C-Webb’s crusade against gun violence

Curtis Mozie, a.k.a. “C-Webb,” has been filming in D.C.’s Shaw neighborhood since the 1980s, documenting inner city life. Mozie’s footage of neighborhood kids growing up eventually became something different, serving as both memorials to those who died in street violence and a form of community journalism in its rawest form.
A turtles-eye view of the National Aquarium

A turtles-eye view of the National Aquarium

The National Aquarium in Baltimore has opened the new Blacktip Reef exhibit—a painstakingly recreated coral reef habitat that is home to hundreds of fish, as well as the Aquarium’s three-flippered sea turtle, Calypso. Later in the summer, blacktip reef sharks will also be added to the reef.
Long exposures, 150 years in the making

Long exposures, 150 years in the making

In Gettysburg, Pa., Rob Gibson keeps a photographic tradition alive by using period accurate equipment and chemicals to make special portraits--wet-plate collodion photographs--of Civil War reenactors. The process is the same that famed Civil War era photographers such as Matthew Brady used, and requires subjects to sit perfectly still for up to 15 seconds for a portrait.
‘Rugby, to me, is life’

‘Rugby, to me, is life’

At Perry Street Prep Public Charter School in NE D.C., head rugby coach Tal Bayer serves as a guiding force for the inner-city students on his team
Where there’s a will, there’s Wale

Where there’s a will, there’s Wale

D.C. pop star Wale reflects on fame, the inspiration for his new album “The Gifted,” his future, and what it means to be a rapper from the District.
On Leadership: The decision to become a doctor

On Leadership: The decision to become a doctor

Lynne Meryl Mofenson, who leads the AIDS branch at the National Institutes of Health and who has done pioneering work in pediatric and maternal AIDS research, shares the story of how she decided to become a physician. She speaks to On Leadership editor Lillian Cunningham for this installent of our “Micro Management Stories” video series.
Bright spots during dark times in Moore, Oklahoma

Bright spots during dark times in Moore, Oklahoma

For the Patteson family in Moore, Ok., small victories--like finding a lost wedding ring--mean everything. The tight-knit community has helped the Pattesons maintain composure as they search the debris of their home for any salvageable belongings.


<span>Coping with loss in Moore, Oklahoma</span>

Coping with loss in Moore, Oklahoma

Nine-year-old Lucas Patteson’s best friend died at Plaza Towers. He and his family survived, but their house was destroyed. Now they are trying to return to normal life following one of the worst tornadoes in American history.
On Leadership: Kah Walla on letting go of your fears

On Leadership: Kah Walla on letting go of your fears

Kah Walla, a former presidential candidate in Cameroon, joins our “Micro Management Stories” video series. She speaks to On Leadership editor Lillian Cunningham about the lesson she learned from her kidnapping.
FEMA sweeps

FEMA sweeps

FEMA sweeps a creek in Moore,Oklahoma where one person is still unaccounted for.
FEMA prepares

FEMA prepares

Members of a FEMA crew prepare to sweep an area of Moore, Okla. damaged by the tornado.
Free clothing and food

Free clothing and food

A roadside tent offers free clothing and food for those seeking refuge in Moore, Oklahoma following a series of damaging tornadoes.
The power of the tornado

The power of the tornado

The tornado that ripped through Moore, Okla. leveled houses, crushed cars and left a neighborhood unrecognizable
Assessing the damage

Assessing the damage

After a series of damaging tornadoes, debris is a common sight in Moore, Oklahoma.
Moore Medical Center

Moore Medical Center

The Moore Medical Center was hit particularly hard during the series of tornadoes.

Multimedia