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A House Divided: April, 2011

Posted at 03:39 PM ET, 04/11/2011

Dennis Frye: By attempting to resupply Ft. Sumter, did President Lincoln purposely provoke the war?

The provocation of civil war came with Lincoln’s election, not Lincoln’s selection. South Carolina seceded because the North acceded to Republican rule--perceived as abolitionist domination--in the Election of 1860.

By Dennis Frye  |  03:39 PM ET, 04/11/2011 |  Permalink  |  Comments ( 0)
Categories:  Views, 150th anniversary

Posted at 03:35 PM ET, 04/11/2011

Craig Symonds: By attempting to resupply Ft. Sumter, did President Lincoln purposely provoke the war?

No.From the first full day of his Presidency, Lincoln’s policy was to prevent a war with the seceded States, not to start one.

By Craig Symonds  |  03:35 PM ET, 04/11/2011 |  Permalink  |  Comments ( 0)
Categories:  Views, 150th anniversary

Posted at 03:30 PM ET, 04/11/2011

Mike Musick: By attempting to resupply Ft. Sumter, did President Lincoln purposely provoke the war?

Some who have considered the matter have concluded that Lincoln did in fact deliberately plan to put the Confederacy in the position of being compelled to fire the first shot.

By Mike Musick  |  03:30 PM ET, 04/11/2011 |  Permalink  |  Comments ( 0)

Posted at 02:52 PM ET, 04/11/2011

John Marszalek: By attempting to resupply Ft. Sumter, did President Lincoln purposely provoke the war?

When Abraham Lincoln took his oath of office, the last thing on his mind was starting a civil war that would consume his entire presidency.

By John Marszalek  |  02:52 PM ET, 04/11/2011 |  Permalink  |  Comments ( 0)
Categories:  150th anniversary, Views

Posted at 01:30 PM ET, 04/11/2011

Lonnie Bunch: By resupplying Ft. Sumter, did Lincoln purposely provoke war?

The notion that Abraham Lincoln purposely provoked the Civil War by attempting to resupply Fort Sumter in April 1861 became a cornerstone of the reinterpretation of the Civil War after the defeat of the Confederacy in 1865.

By  |  01:30 PM ET, 04/11/2011 |  Permalink  |  Comments ( 0)
Categories:  Views, 150th anniversary

Posted at 07:21 PM ET, 04/01/2011

Civil War Trust offers animated map of Ft. Sumter battle

The Civil War Trust offers an animated map of the first battle of the war.

By Linda Wheeler  |  07:21 PM ET, 04/01/2011 |  Permalink  |  Comments ( 0)

Posted at 04:51 PM ET, 03/31/2011

Dennis Frye: How pervasive was the abolitionist movement and did it influence any of the southern states to secede?

The foundation of the nation was perched precariously atop the seismic fault line of slavery. Slavery shook the Union. Abolitionists applied the pressure that heaved the nation into civil war.

By Dennis Frye  |  04:51 PM ET, 03/31/2011 |  Permalink  |  Comments ( 0)
Categories:  Views, 150th anniversary

Posted at 05:47 PM ET, 03/29/2011

Sesquicentennial edition of Ken Burns’s Civil War available

Special edition has extras from Shelby Foote.

By Linda Wheeler  |  05:47 PM ET, 03/29/2011 |  Permalink  |  Comments ( 0)

Posted at 05:04 PM ET, 03/29/2011

Park Day is chance to work at Civil War site

On Saturday, April 2, volunteers can make 118 Civil War sites across the country look better.

By Linda Wheeler  |  05:04 PM ET, 03/29/2011 |  Permalink  |  Comments ( 0)
Categories:  Battlefields

Posted at 04:32 PM ET, 03/28/2011

John Marszalek: General-in-Chief Winfield Scott’s Anaconda Plan called for the early blockading of sea ports and the Mississippi River to strangle the rebellion; could that plan have worked?

Winfield Scott was one of the nation’s military legends. When he decided not to join secession, even though he was a Virginian, supporters of the Union breathed a collective sigh of relief.

By John Marszalek  |  04:32 PM ET, 03/28/2011 |  Permalink  |  Comments ( 0)
Categories:  150th anniversary, Views

Posted at 04:04 PM ET, 03/28/2011

Craig Symonds: General-in-Chief Winfield Scott’s Anaconda Plan called for the early blockading of sea ports and the Mississippi River to strangle the rebellion; could that plan have worked?

There is a lot of misunderstanding about Winfield Scott’s so-called Anaconda Plan. First of all, it never was never really a full-blown operational or even a strategic “plan.”

By Craig Symonds  |  04:04 PM ET, 03/28/2011 |  Permalink  |  Comments ( 0)

Posted at 03:36 PM ET, 03/28/2011

Frank Williams: General-in-Chief Winfield Scott’s Anaconda Plan called for the early blockading of sea ports and the Mississippi River to strangle the rebellion; could that plan have worked?

Septuagenarian General Winfield Scott’s Anaconda Plan, although ridiculed at first, was proved to be sound but took years and many casualties to effectuate.

By Frank Williams  |  03:36 PM ET, 03/28/2011 |  Permalink  |  Comments ( 0)
Categories:  Views, 150th anniversary

Posted at 03:27 PM ET, 03/28/2011

Lonnie Bunch: General-in-Chief Winfield Scott’s Anaconda Plan called for the early blockading of sea ports and the Mississippi River to strangle the rebellion; could that plan have worked?

General Winfield Scott, the hero of the Mexican-American War, devised a strategy to defeat the recently seceding Southern states that became known as the Anaconda Plan because of the plan’s attempt to surround and strangle the nascent Confederacy.

By Lonnie Bunch  |  03:27 PM ET, 03/28/2011 |  Permalink  |  Comments ( 0)
Categories:  150th anniversary, Views

Posted at 03:23 PM ET, 03/28/2011

Scott Hartwig: General-in-Chief Winfild’s Anaconda Plan called for the early blockading of sea ports and the Mississippi River to strangle the rebellion; could that plan have worked?

In brief, General Scott’s plan called for “a complete blockade” of the Atlantic and Gulf ports to strangle the Confederacy, and a thrust down the Mississippi River with some 60,000 troops to cut the Confederacy in two.

By Scott Hartwig  |  03:23 PM ET, 03/28/2011 |  Permalink  |  Comments ( 0)
Categories:  150th anniversary, Views

Posted at 11:05 AM ET, 03/28/2011

Civil War knowledge could equal college scholarship

Ten scholarships ranging from $1,000 to $15,000 will be awarded by HISTORY (formerly the History Chanel) and Houghlin Mifflin Harcourt publishing company in a timed, inline quiz planned for April 7 to 9.

By Linda Wheeler  |  11:05 AM ET, 03/28/2011 |  Permalink  |  Comments ( 0)
Categories:  News

Posted at 03:31 PM ET, 03/25/2011

Tweeting the Civil War: Confederate forces build up armaments and begin recruiting in Baltimore

The Washington Post is tweeting the Civil War, in the words of the people who lived it -- from journals, letters, official records and newspapers of the day. This week in 1861, Confederate forces build up their armaments and begin recruiting in Baltimore.

By Mary Hadar  |  03:31 PM ET, 03/25/2011 |  Permalink  |  Comments ( 0)
Categories:  150th anniversary, Tweeting the war

Posted at 12:47 PM ET, 03/21/2011

John Marszalek: How pervasive was the abolitionist movement and did it influence any of the southern states to secede?

The abolitionists themselves were anti-slavery but not necessarily believers in equality.

By John Marszalek  |  12:47 PM ET, 03/21/2011 |  Permalink  |  Comments ( 0)
Categories:  150th anniversary, Views

Posted at 12:30 PM ET, 03/21/2011

Frank Williams: How pervasive was the abolitionist movement and did it influence any of the southern states to secede?

Abolitionism, along with simmering fears of Northern majoritarianism, was clearly a factor in the secession of Southern states.

By Frank Williams  |  12:30 PM ET, 03/21/2011 |  Permalink  |  Comments ( 0)
Categories:  150th anniversary, Views

Posted at 12:30 PM ET, 03/21/2011

Brag Bowling: How pervasive was the abolitionist movement and did it influence any of the southern states to secede?

It would be impossible to state that the abolitionist movement did not generally influence the secession of any Southern state.9

By Brag Bowling  |  12:30 PM ET, 03/21/2011 |  Permalink  |  Comments ( 0)
Categories:  150th anniversary, Views

Posted at 12:20 PM ET, 03/21/2011

Lonnie Bunch: How pervasive was the abolitionist movement and did it influence any of the southern states to secede?

Abolitionists were a very diverse group whose positions and fervor differed based on ideological, racial, and political differences.

By Lonnie Bunch  |  12:20 PM ET, 03/21/2011 |  Permalink  |  Comments ( 0)
Categories:  150th anniversary, Views

Posted at 12:44 PM ET, 03/18/2011

Tweeting the Civil War: Lincoln looks into reinforcing Ft. Sumter

The Washington Post is tweeting the Civil War, in the words of the people who lived it -- from journals, letters, official records and newspapers of the day. This week in 1861, Lincoln looks into reinforcing9 Ft. Sumter.

By Mary Hadar  |  12:44 PM ET, 03/18/2011 |  Permalink  |  Comments ( 0)
Categories:  Tweeting the war, 150th anniversary

Posted at 12:28 PM ET, 03/17/2011

Document: Lincoln’s letter to a boy

In the midst of the secession crisis, Lincoln took the time to respond to a letter from a boy whose classmates didn’t believe he had met the president.

By Mary Hadar  |  12:28 PM ET, 03/17/2011 |  Permalink  |  Comments ( 0)
Categories:  150th anniversary, Documents

Posted at 04:02 PM ET, 03/11/2011

Tweeting the Civil War: Rumors of an imminent invasion begin to circulate in Charleston and Montgomery

The Washington Post is tweeting the Civil War, in the words of the people who lived it -- from journals, letters, official records and newspapers of the day. This week in 1861, rumors of an imminent invasion begin to circulate in Charleston and Montgomery.

By Mary Hadar  |  04:02 PM ET, 03/11/2011 |  Permalink  |  Comments ( 0)
Categories:  Tweeting the war, 150th anniversary, 150th anniversary

Posted at 04:20 PM ET, 03/10/2011

Disunion lobbyists important to secession movement

The Washington Post is tweeting the Civil War, in the words of the people who lived it -- from journals, letters, official records and newspapers of the day. This week in 1861, Lincoln is inaugurated.

By  |  04:20 PM ET, 03/10/2011 |  Permalink  |  Comments ( 0)
Categories:  A House Divided

Posted at 04:20 PM ET, 03/04/2011

Tweeting the Civil War: Lincoln is inaugurated

The Washington Post is tweeting the Civil War, in the words of the people who lived it -- from journals, letters, official records and newspapers of the day. This week in 1861, Lincoln is inaugurated.

By  |  04:20 PM ET, 03/04/2011 |  Permalink  |  Comments ( 0)
Categories:  A House Divided, Tweeting the war

Posted at 11:31 AM ET, 03/02/2011

Civil War soldiers to be honored in Living Legacy Tree Planting program

More than 100 miles of Virginia, Maryland and Pennsylvania roadway is about to get a little more green thanks to funding from the Commonwealth and a vision by Journey Through Hallowed Ground Partnership officials who created a program to honor...

By Jennifer Buske  |  11:31 AM ET, 03/02/2011 |  Permalink  |  Comments ( 0)
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