wpostServer: http://css.washingtonpost.com/wpost

The Post Most: Local

A House Divided: May, 2011

Posted at 11:42 AM ET, 05/06/2011

Dennis Frye: What authority did Abraham Lincoln have to call up 75,000 troops to defend Washington and to blockade most Southern ports?

”The proclamation of blockade by the President is, of itself, conclusive evidence that a state of war existed which demanded and authorized recourse to such measure.” Thus determined the United States Supreme Court in the Prize Cases, settled in 1862 in a split 5-4 decision.

By Dennis Frye  |  11:42 AM ET, 05/06/2011 |  Permalink  |  Comments ( 0)
Categories:  150th anniversary, Views, Views

Posted at 11:33 AM ET, 05/06/2011

William Blair: What legal authority did Abraham Lincoln have to call up 75,000 troops to defend Washington and to blockade most Southern ports?

To find the answer to this two-pronged question, forget about the Constitution. This fundamental law of the nation is surprisingly quiet about any war powers that the president might claim. In fact, the term “war powers” never appears under the the sections dealing with the executive.

By William Blair  |  11:33 AM ET, 05/06/2011 |  Permalink  |  Comments ( 0)
Categories:  150th anniversary, Views, Views

Posted at 11:28 AM ET, 05/01/2011

Tweeting the Civil War: Washington is secured

The Washington Post is tweeting the Civil War, in the words of the people who lived it -- from journals, letters, official records and newspapers of the day. This week in 1861, Washington is secured.

By Mary Hadar  |  11:28 AM ET, 05/01/2011 |  Permalink  |  Comments ( 0)
Categories:  150th anniversary, Tweeting the war, Tweeting the war

Posted at 08:00 AM ET, 04/27/2011

Frank Williams: What legal authority did President Lincoln have to call up 75,000 troops to defend Washington and to order the blockade of most Southern ports?

When the war started both sides underestimated the passion and intensity of the other. President Lincoln called for 75,000 volunteers to serve for only three months - his estimate of the duration of the rebellion....

By Frank Williams  |  08:00 AM ET, 04/27/2011 |  Permalink  |  Comments ( 0)

Posted at 08:00 AM ET, 04/27/2011

John Marszalek: What legal authority did President Lincoln have to call up 75,000 troops to defend Washington and to order the blockade of most Southern ports?

Lincoln had acted unilaterally because he did not want to ask Congress for a declaration of war, believing that such an act would give the Confederacy recognition as an independent nation...

By Linda Wheeler  |  08:00 AM ET, 04/27/2011 |  Permalink  |  Comments ( 0)
Categories:  Views, Views, 150th anniversary, 150th anniversary

Posted at 08:00 AM ET, 04/27/2011

Harold Holzer: What legal authority did President Lincoln have to call up 75,000 troops to defend Washington and to order the blockade of most Southern ports?

Established 18th century law arguably gave Abraham Lincoln adequate power to confront the gravest crisis in the 19th century by calling for volunteers after the attack on Fort Sumter....

By Harold Holzer  |  08:00 AM ET, 04/27/2011 |  Permalink  |  Comments ( 0)
Categories:  Views, 150th anniversary, 150th anniversary

Posted at 09:48 PM ET, 04/22/2011

Tweeting the Civil War: Riots break out in Baltimore

The Washington Post is tweeting the Civil War, in the words of the people who lived it -- from journals, letters, official records and newspapers of the day. This week in 1861, riots break out in Baltimore.

By Mary Hadar  |  09:48 PM ET, 04/22/2011 |  Permalink  |  Comments ( 0)

Posted at 08:26 PM ET, 04/19/2011

Jim Campi: How do you explain the crazed, homicidal fury of city residents during the Baltimore Riots of April 19, 1861 in response to Massachusetts troops passing through that city; was that event an anomaly?

One day after the fall of Fort Sumter, President Lincoln issued a proclamation calling for 75,000 volunteers to put down the rebellion. The proclamation stoked passions already running at a fever pitch.

By Jim Campi  |  08:26 PM ET, 04/19/2011 |  Permalink  |  Comments ( 0)
Categories:  150th anniversary, Views, Views

Posted at 10:00 AM ET, 04/19/2011

Frank Williams:How do you explain the crazed, homicidal fury of city residents during the Baltimore Riots of April 19, 1861 in response to Massachusetts troops passing through that city. Was that event an anomaly?

Passions ran deep with the Baltimore “rowdies” prior to their attack on the Sixth Massachusetts Regiment. The plot to assassinate President-elect Lincoln on his passage through Baltimore on February 23, 1861 required the mobs to distract and incite the populace...

By Frank Williams  |  10:00 AM ET, 04/19/2011 |  Permalink  |  Comments ( 0)
Categories:  Views, 150th anniversary, 150th anniversary

Posted at 10:00 AM ET, 04/19/2011

Dennis Frye: How do you explain the crazed, homicidal fury of city residents during the Baltimore Riots of April 19, 1861 in response to Massachusetts troops passing through that city. Was that event an anomaly?

Baltimore was a melting pot that was in regular meltdown during much of the 1850s. It was also the largest the largest city in the South....

By Linda Wheeler  |  10:00 AM ET, 04/19/2011 |  Permalink  |  Comments ( 0)
Categories:  150th anniversary, Views, Views

Posted at 10:00 AM ET, 04/19/2011

Dana Shoaf: How do you explain the crazed, homicidal fury of city residents during the Baltimore Riots of April 19, 1861 in response to Massachusetts troops passing through that city. Was that event an anomaly?

If other upper South cities were similarly tied to the plantation economy for their well-being, I believe violence would have occurred.

By Dana Shoaf  |  10:00 AM ET, 04/19/2011 |  Permalink  |  Comments ( 0)
Categories:  150th anniversary, Views, Views

Posted at 10:00 AM ET, 04/19/2011

Harold Holzer: How do you explain the crazed, homicidal fury of city residents during the Baltimore Riots of April 19, 1861 in response to Massachusetts troops passing through that city. Was that event an anomaly?

Horrifically bloody as it was, the fury that a pro-secession mob unleashed against federal troops on the streets of Baltimore in April 1861 should have surprised no one--least of all President Abraham Lincoln.

By Harold Holzer  |  10:00 AM ET, 04/19/2011 |  Permalink  |  Comments ( 0)
Categories:  150th anniversary, Views, Views

Posted at 10:00 AM ET, 04/19/2011

William Blair: How do you explain the crazed, homicidal fury of city residents during the Baltimore Riots of April 19, 1861 in response to Massachusetts troops passing through that city? Was that event an anomaly?

The Baltimore Riot was significant and shocking to some extent, but it represented a rather unremarkable explosion of street violence.

By William Blair  |  10:00 AM ET, 04/19/2011 |  Permalink  |  Comments ( 0)
Categories:  Views, 150th anniversary, 150th anniversary

Posted at 08:16 AM ET, 04/19/2011

First Civil War deaths took place in Baltimore

Luther Ladd answered his country’s call, but he never made it to Washington. The first deaths of the Civil War took place on the streets of Baltimore.

By Gene Thorp  |  08:16 AM ET, 04/19/2011 |  Permalink  |  Comments ( 0)
Categories:  150th anniversary, 150th anniversary

Posted at 10:55 PM ET, 04/15/2011

Tweeting the Civil War: Confederate guns open fire on Fort Sumter

The Washington Post is tweeting the Civil War, in the words of the people who lived it -- from journals, letters, official records and newspapers of the day. This week in 1861, Confederates fire on Ft. Sumter.

By Mary Hadar  |  10:55 PM ET, 04/15/2011 |  Permalink  |  Comments ( 0)

Posted at 11:22 AM ET, 04/15/2011

Document: Lincoln’s Call to Arms

After the fall of Fort Sumter, President Lincoln called up 75,000 men from the state militias to suppress the rebellion and to “cause the laws to be duly executed.”

By Mary Hadar  |  11:22 AM ET, 04/15/2011 |  Permalink  |  Comments ( 0)
Categories:  150th anniversary, Views

Posted at 03:37 PM ET, 04/14/2011

Casino plan for Gettysburg shot down

The controversial proposal to open a gambling casino near the Gettysburg battlefield was shot down this morning when the Pennsylvania Gaming Control Board chose a different applicant for the license.

By Linda Wheeler  |  03:37 PM ET, 04/14/2011 |  Permalink  |  Comments ( 0)
Categories:  News

Posted at 11:12 AM ET, 04/14/2011

Country music singer Trace Adkins testifies on battlefield preservation

This morning, singer-songwriter Trace Adkins is scheduled to testify before an appropriations subcommittee on Capitol Hill on the importance of preserving Civil War battlefields. He is the great-great-grandson of a Confederate soldier who was wounded and captured at Vicksburg.

By Linda Wheeler  |  11:12 AM ET, 04/14/2011 |  Permalink  |  Comments ( 0)
Categories:  News

Posted at 05:17 PM ET, 04/11/2011

Live Tweeting the Civil War: Showdown at Ft. Sumter

The Washington Post is Tweeting developments in real time. Watch for the notification from General Beauregard to Major Anderson at 3:20 a.m. that bombardment will commence in an hour, eyewitness accounts of the conflict and the Union’s heart-wrenching surrender as the troops salute their flag.

By Mary Hadar  |  05:17 PM ET, 04/11/2011 |  Permalink  |  Comments ( 0)

Posted at 03:07 PM ET, 04/11/2011

Brag Bowling: By resupplying Ft. Sumter, did Lincoln purposely provoke war?

By Brag Bowling  |  03:07 PM ET, 04/11/2011 |  Permalink  |  Comments ( 0)
Categories:  Views, 150th anniversary

Posted at 09:35 AM ET, 04/08/2011

African Americans have cause to celebrate war’s anniversary

Sen. Robert Ford tells African Americans to take part and connect

By Linda Wheeler  |  09:35 AM ET, 04/08/2011 |  Permalink  |  Comments ( 0)
Categories:  150th anniversary, News

Posted at 05:54 PM ET, 04/07/2011

Federal shutdown would shutter Ft. Sumter

If the federal government does shut down this weekend, Fort Sumter will close just as the commemoration of the start of the Civil War 150 years ago is beginning.

By Linda Wheeler  |  05:54 PM ET, 04/07/2011 |  Permalink  |  Comments ( 0)
Categories:  A House Divided, A House Divided, 150th anniversary, Battlefields, News

Posted at 12:32 PM ET, 04/07/2011

Higher rates proposed for Gettysburg museum

A visit to the Gettysburg National Military Park Museum and Visitors Center will cost considerably more by next year if rate increases are approved.

By Linda Wheeler  |  12:32 PM ET, 04/07/2011 |  Permalink  |  Comments ( 0)
Categories:  A House Divided, News, A House Divided, News

Posted at 07:41 PM ET, 04/04/2011

Petersburg battlefield park could triple in size

Legislation offered by Virginia senators would nearly triple the size.

By Linda Wheeler  |  07:41 PM ET, 04/04/2011 |  Permalink  |  Comments ( 0)

Posted at 04:28 PM ET, 04/01/2011

Tweeting the Civil War: Lincolns orders Ft. Sumter to be reinforced

The Washington Post is tweeting the Civil War, in the words of the people who lived it -- from journals, letters, official records and newspapers of the day. This week in 1861, Lincolns orders Ft. Sumter to be reinforced.

By Mary Hadar  |  04:28 PM ET, 04/01/2011 |  Permalink  |  Comments ( 0)
Categories:  150th anniversary, Tweeting the war

 

© 2011 The Washington Post Company