The week ahead on the Hill: Democrats keep up payroll tax pressure; Cordray up for a vote

December 5, 2011

Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid is expected to offer Democrats’ latest proposal on extending the payroll tax cut. (Pablo Martinez Monsivais/Associated Press)

Also happening this week: The Senate is expected to vote Thursday on the nomination of former Ohio attorney general Richard Cordray to serve as director of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. With 45 Senate Republicans vowing to oppose any nominee unless structural changes are made to the agency, it’s unlikely Cordray will secure the 60 votes needed for confirmation, leaving the watchdog agency, which opened its doors in July, blocked from exercising its full authority.

On the House side, the payroll tax cut debate is also expected to ramp up, as are efforts on legislation to keep the federal government funded through next year ahead of a Dec. 16 deadline.

On Tuesday House Speaker John Boehner (R-Ohio) lights the Capitol Christmas tree. And on Thursday, former New Jersey Gov. Jon Corzine (D) is expected to testify at a House Agriculture Committee hearing on “Examination of MF Global Bankruptcy.”

A closer look at the week ahead:

Monday

The House is in at 12 p.m. to consider a series of measures under suspension of the rules. No votes are expected. The Senate is also in session at 2 p.m., with votes expected at 5:30 p.m. on four judicial nominations.

Committee hearings/other events:

3 p.m.: A House Foreign Affairs subcommittee holds a hearing on “Fighting Malaria: Progress and Challenges.”

6 p.m.: The Alexander Hamilton Society holds a discussion at the Metropolitan Club on “China, America, & the Struggle for Mastery in Asia.”

7 p.m.: Young Professionals in Foreign Policy (YPFP) holds a book discussion on “Rock the Casbah.”

Tuesday

The House is in at 10 a.m. Votes are expected as early as 1 p.m. on a series of suspensions as well as on H.R. 10, the Regulations From the Executive in Need of Scrutiny (REINS) Act; and H.R. 1633, the Farm Dust Regulation Prevention Act. The Senate is also in session.

Committee hearings/other events:

9:30 a.m.: The United States Institute of Peace holds a discussion on “Women Fighting for Peace in Iraq.”

9:30 a.m.: The Woodrow Wilson Center holds a discussion on “Doing Business in a More Transparent World.”

9:30 a.m.: Community, labor, “Occupy” and other groups hold a “Take back the Capitol!” rally and march from Union Station to the Capitol.

10 a.m.: The House Ways and Means Committee and the Senate Finance Committee hold a joint hearing on “Tax Reform and the Tax Treatment of Financial Products.”

10 a.m.: The Senate Banking Committee holds a hearing on “Continued Oversight on the Implementation of the ‘Wall Street Reform Act.”’

10 a.m.: A Senate Homeland Security subcommittee holds a hearing on “Whistleblower Protections for Government Contractors.”

10 a.m.: Former Sen. Arlen Specter (D-Pa.) testifies at a Senate Judiciary subcommittee hearing on “Access to the Court: Televising the Supreme Court.”

10 a.m.: The House Financial Services Committee holds a hearing on the “Stop Trading on Congressional Knowledge Act.”

10:30 a.m.: The American Enterprise Institute holds a discussion on “The Costs of Containing Iran: More Than the U.S. is Bargaining For.” Participants include Sen. Mark Kirk (R-Ill.).

Noon: The Aspen Institute holds a book discussion on “Who’s Afraid of Post-Blackness? What it Means to be Black Now.” Participants include Toure, author; and Gwen Ifill, senior correspondent at PBS NewsHour and moderator and managing editor at Washington Week with Gwen Ifill.

Noon: The Potomac Institute for Policy Studies’ International Center for Terrorism Studies holds a discussion on “Iran’s Nuclear Program: A Final Warning?”

1 p.m.: A House Judiciary subcommittee holds a hearing on the “Susan B. Anthony and Frederick Douglass Prenatal Nondiscrimination Act (PRENDA) of 2011.”

1:30 p.m.: The Heritage Foundation holds a discussion on “The Russian Post-Election Situation and Its Political and Policy Implications.”

2 p.m.: The American Enterprise Institute holds a discussion on “Simple Steps to Financial Reform: It’s All in the Incentives.”

2 p.m.: The Congressional-Executive Commission on China holds a hearing on “One Year After the Nobel Peace Prize Award to Liu Xiaobo: Conditions for Political Prisoners and Prospects for Political Reform.”

2 p.m.: A House Homeland Security subcommittee holds a hearing on “Jihadist Use of Social Media — How to Prevent Terrorism and Preserve Innovation.”

5 p.m.: The U.S. Capitol Christmas Tree lighting ceremony. Participants include House Speaker John Boehner (R-Ohio).

Wednesday

The House is in at 10 a.m. to continue its consideration of the measures it began taking up on Tuesday. The Senate is also in session.

Committee hearings/other events:

9:30 a.m.: The House and Senate Homeland Security Committees hold a joint hearing on “Homegrown Terrorism: The Threat to Military Communities Inside the United States.”

10 a.m.: The Heritage Foundation holds a discussion on “The Electoral College and National Popular Vote Plan.” Participants include Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.).

10 a.m.: The Senate Finance Committee holds a hearing on “Drug Shortages: Why They Happen and What They Mean.”

10 a.m.: A House Oversight subcommittee holds a hearing on “Oversight in Iraq and Afghanistan: Challenges and Solutions.”

Noon: The Women’s Foreign Policy Group holds a discussion on “Covering Libya: A View from the Front Lines.” Participants include The Washington Post’s Mary Beth Sheridan and Reuters reporter Missy Ryan.

12:30 p.m.: The International Foundation for Electoral Systems holds a news conference at the National Press Club on “After the Arab Spring: Challenges for Credible Elections.”

12:30 p.m.: The Heritage Foundation holds a book discussion on “Throw Them All Out.” Participants include author, Peter Schweizer, research fellow at the Hoover Institution at Stanford University.

12:30 p.m.: The George Washington University Elliott School of International Affairs holds a discussion on “China’s Underground Great Wall Challenge for Arms Control.”

2 p.m.: A Senate Banking subcommittee holds a hearing on “Enhanced Supervision: A New Regime for Regulating Large, Complex Financial Institutions.”

2:30 p.m.: A House Foreign Affairs subcommittee holds a hearing on “Camp Ashraf: Iraqi Obligations and State Department Accountability.”

6 p.m.: The Center for American Progress holds a film screening and discussion at the Gala Hispanic Theater on “A Better Life.” Participants include Sen. Robert Menendez (D-N.J.).

Thursday

The House is in at 9 a.m. The Senate is also in session.

Committee hearings/other events:

9 a.m.: The Internal Revenue Service holds a meeting to gather feedback on how to implement a series of long-term changes to the tax system.

9 a.m.: The George Washington University Elliott School of International Affairs and Sigur Center for Asian Studies hold a discussion on “Taiwan in a Shifting International Landscape.”

9:30 a.m.: Sesame Street holds a panel discussion at the National Press Club on “Eating Well on a Budget,” focusing on research conducted by Field Research Corporation and its initiative that has “promoted healthy habits in young children and their families struggling with hunger.”

9:30 a.m.: Former New Jersey Gov. Jon Corzine (D) has been subpoenaed to testify at a House Agriculture Committee hearing on “Examination of MF Global Bankruptcy.”

9:30 a.m.: Attorney General Eric Holder testifies at a House Judiciary Committee hearing on oversight of the Justice Department.

9:45 a.m.: The Senate HELP Committee holds a hearing on “Tales from the Unemployment Line: Barriers Facing the Long-Term Unemployed.”

10 a.m.: The House Select Intelligence Committee holds a closed-door hearing.

11 a.m.: The Senate Indian Affairs Committee holds a hearing on state and federal tax policy, focusing on building new markets in Indian country.

Noon: The Clare Boothe Luce Policy Institute’s Conservative Women’s Network holds a discussion at the Heritage Foundation on “Now or Never: Why 2012 Must Be the Year We Save America from Economic Collapse.” Participants include Sen. Jim DeMint (R-S.C.).

Noon: The Middle East Institute holds a discussion on the policy paper “The Arab Spring: Implications for U.S. Policy and Interests.”

2 p.m.: The Center for Strategic and International Studies holds a discussion on “Sharing Risk in a World of Dangers and Opportunities: U.S. Development Finance Tools.” Participants include Sen. Johnny Isakson (R-Ga.).

2:45 p.m.: Rep. Steve Chabot (R-Ohio) delivers remarks at a Foundation for the Defense of Democracies’ conference at the Newseum on “Ideology, Power, and Alliances in a Changing Middle East.”

4 p.m.: Rep. Eliot Engel (D-N.Y.) delivers remarks at a Foundation for the Defense of Democracies’ conference at the Newseum on “Ideology, Power, and Alliances in a Changing Middle East.”

Friday

The House is not scheduled to be in session at this time. The Senate is in session.

Committee hearings/other events:

9 a.m.: The National Legal Aid & Defender Association holds its Centennial Conference at the Washington Marriott Wardman Park, focusing on the legal needs of low-income people.

9 a.m.: The Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS) holds a conference on “The Strategic Power of Vaccines.”

9:30 a.m.: The American Enterprise Institute National Research Initiative holds a discussion in Rayburn B-340 on “Is the Federal Housing Administration (FHA) the Next Housing Bailout?”

Noon: The Washington International Trade Association holds a “International Trade Career Roundtable: US AID Contractors — What Are International Recruiters Looking For?”

Continue reading
Comments
Show Comments
Most Read

politics

Success! Check your inbox for details.

See all newsletters