wpostServer: http://css.washingtonpost.com/wpost

The Post Most: Politics

Read In

Now Viewing: People from around the country looking at Post Politics section

See what's being read across the country ›

Social Surface: Politics

2chambers
Posted at 04:12 PM ET, 06/20/2011

Weiner to officially resign Tuesday


(By Seth Wenig/Associated Press)
Anthony Weiner may have announced his resignation last week, but he’s technically not a former member of Congress – yet.

The New York Democrat, who last Thursday announced his plans to step down amid pressure from senior Democrats and a nearly three-week-long media firestorm over lewd photos he sent online to at least six women across the country, will formally resign Tuesday, according to a letter he sent Monday to New York Secretary of State Cesar Perales, New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo (D), House Speaker John Boehner (R-Ohio) and House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.).

 “I hereby resign as the Member of the House of Representatives for New York’s Ninth Congressional District effective at midnight, Tuesday, June 21, 2011,” Weiner’s resignation letter reads. “It has been an honor to serve the people of Queens and Brooklyn.”

The letter is expected to be laid down on the House floor Tuesday, according to a senior Democratic aide. The House met only briefly Monday morning for a pro forma session during which no official business was conducted.

Weiner has continued to accrue his congressional pay in the wake of a news conference two weeks ago during which he tearfully acknowledged that he had lied about his inappropriate communications with women he’d met online.

The $174,000 annual salary Weiner makes as a member of Congress amounts to about $477 a day – for a total of about $2,385 for the five days since Weiner’s resignation announcement last week.

According to the Committee on House Administration, which oversees congressional pay, members are paid on the first business day of each month for the preceding month. If a member resigns, their pay is prorated based on the date of their resignation.

 Because Weiner’s resignation comes during the latter part of this month, there’s a chance that House officials may not have enough time to process his prorated paycheck in time. In that case, Weiner might receive his full paycheck for the month of June, and would then have to reimburse the House for any overpayment.

According to the New York Post, Weiner and his wife, Huma Abedin, were at their Washington apartment Sunday. The two were also seen Thursday making a stop at a Long Island supermarket on their way to the Hamptons, hours after the news conference at which Weiner announced his resignation.

This post has been updated since it was first published.

By  |  04:12 PM ET, 06/20/2011

 
Read what others are saying
     

    © 2011 The Washington Post Company