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Posted at 08:00 AM ET, 08/02/2012

Which Democrats voted for the House Republican tax cut plan?


Rep. Gerry Connolly (D-Va.), photographed in November 2010. (Alex Brandon - ASSOCIATED PRESS)
The Republican-led House of Representatives voted Wednesday to extend expiring George W. Bush-era tax cuts at all income levels for another year.

With Congress leaving Washington on Friday for a month-long recess, the vote was a pre-election statement of the GOP’s unyielding opposition to raising taxes for any taxpayer — but it also earned support from a handful of Democrats facing difficult reelection campaigns this fall.

So which Democrats voted with the Republicans? Check this out:

ON THE BILL TO EXTEND BUSH-ERA TAX CUTS FOR ALL INCOME LEVELS FOR ANOTHER YEAR:

Final vote count: 256-171, according to The Washington Post Congressional Votes Databse.

One Republican voted against the measure: Rep. Tim Johnson (R-Ill.) (who is retiring)

19 Democrats voted with Republicans to approve the bill:

Rep. John Barrow (D-Ga.)

Rep. Sanford Bishop (D-Ga.)

Rep. Dan Boren (D-Okla.)

Rep. Leonard Boswell (D-Iowa)

Rep. Ben Chandler (D-Ky.)

Rep. Gerald E. Connolly (D-Va.)

Rep. Jim Costa (D-Calif.)

Rep. Mark Critz (D-Pa.)

Rep. Henry Cuellar (D-Tex.)

Rep. Joe Donnelly (D-Ind.)

Rep. Larry Kissell (D-N.C.)

Rep. David Loebsack (D-Iowa)

Rep. Jim Matheson (D-Utah)

Rep. Mike McIntyre (D-N.C.)

Rep. Jerry McNerney (D-Calif.)

Rep. Bill Owens (D-N.Y.)

Rep. Collin Peterson (D-Minn.)

Rep. Mike Ross (D-Ark.)

Rep. Tim Walz (D-Minn.)

Some notes on the vote: Collectively, these 19 Democrats vote with their party just 72 percent of the time. Donnelly, who is running for the U.S. Senate and touting his moderate record, votes with Democrats just 67 percent of the time, according to our votes database. Of these 19 Democrats, several have consistently abandoned the party on high-profile votes, including Boren (who is retiring), Kissell, McIntyre and Matheson (who face difficult reelection bids) and Ross (who is retiring, but many one day run for statewide office).

How did your lawmaker vote? Explore The Washington Post Congressional Votes Database

Follow Ed O’Keefe on Twitter: @edatpost

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