Florida bungles teacher evaluation results

In the you-can’t-make-up-this-stuff category, consider this story from the Tampa Bay Times, which starts:

Florida’s Department of Education on Wednesday rolled out the results of a sweeping new teacher evaluation system that is designed to be a more accurate, helpful and data-driven measure of how well teachers actually get students to learn.

 

And then, within hours of releasing the data, the department pulled the numbers off its website and sheepishly admitted that much of it was wrong.

 

State officials late Wednesday said thousands of teachers were mistakenly double-counted because they had more than one “job code” in computerized records. That skewed the results.

 

Department spokeswoman Cynthia Sucher acknowledged it was “distressing” for the agency to learn that the information turned out to be incorrect.

 

Distressing is something of an understatement, especially considering that this is not the first time this year that the department has messed up with data. The story notes that 200 schools received incorrect grades from the state earlier this year. And, the department, after deciding to make the writing part of the state assessment test harder, lowered the passing mark after student scores plummeted.

Talk about data-driven education.

Here’s the whole sorry story.

Valerie Strauss covers education and runs The Answer Sheet blog.

local

answer-sheet

Success! Check your inbox for details. You might also like:

Please enter a valid email address

See all newsletters

Comments
Show Comments
Most Read Local

local

answer-sheet

Success! Check your inbox for details.

See all newsletters

Next Story
Valerie Strauss · December 5, 2012

To keep reading, please enter your email address.

You’ll also receive from The Washington Post:
  • A free 6-week digital subscription
  • Our daily newsletter in your inbox

Please enter a valid email address

I have read and agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy.

Please indicate agreement.

Thank you.

Check your inbox. We’ve sent an email explaining how to set up an account and activate your free digital subscription.