A school counselor’s request to Michelle Obama

WASHINGTON, DC - NOVEMBER 12: First lady Michelle Obama speaks to students about higher education during an event at the Bell Multicultural High School, November 12, 2013 in Washington, DC. The first lady told students to commit to their education so that they can create a better future for themselves and their country. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)
Michelle Obama speaks to students at Bell Multicultural High School in the District this week.  (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

First Lady Michelle Obama has taken on a new policy role: helping to promote the idea among young people about the important of going to college. She began this week speaking to students at Bell Multicultural High School in the District, telling them about the goal President Obama set several years for the United States to have the highest college graduation rate in the world by 2020.  (You can see the transcript of her comments here.) She said:

But Barack didn’t just set that goal because it’s good for our country.  He did it because he knows how important higher education is to all of you as individuals.  Because when the year 2020 rolls around, nearly two-thirds of all jobs in this country are going to require some form of training beyond high school.  That means whether it’s a vocational program, community college, a four-year university, you all are going to need some form of higher education in order to build the kind of lives that you want for yourselves, good careers, to be able to provide for your family.

 

In response to those remarks, Patrick O’Connor, associate dean of college counseling at Cranbrook Kingswood School in Bloomfield Hills, Mich.,  a counselor educator at Oakland Community College, and a former president of the National Association for College Admission Counseling, wrote an open letter to the first lady asking her to help with something.

Here’s his letter:

Mrs. Obama, your remarks this week to Washington DC sophomores were inspiring, both to the students, and to those who work with students in choosing a college.  By highlighting the White House’s progress in making college information accessible to the public, you’ve encouraged students to make the most out of College Navigator and College Scorecard.  In emphasizing the importance of daily homework habits and making the most of every opportunity available to students, you’ve inspired them to build the study skills and interests that will serve them well in high school, college, and beyond.

It is also encouraging to know this was the first of many conversations you’ll be having about college access—and as you build your schedule of college conversations, I hope there will be time for one about counselor readiness.  College experts recognize school counselors as uniquely situated to make a significant difference in the college plans of every student.  We see the students in school, we know their strengths and interests, and we take every opportunity to help them make strong choices about college.

But just like the statistic you cited that puts the United States 12th in the world among college graduates, school counselors know they could do better helping students make good, personalized college plans.  We’re well aware of national surveys where young adults report their counselor was of little help with college selection, and while it hurts when at-risk valedictorians call us “pretty lousy” and “incompetent”, we understand where they’re coming from.

Two years of College Board survey results show counselors wish we had been better prepared for college counseling when we were trained.  Only 30 of the hundreds of counselor training programs in our country offer a course in college counseling, and only one or two require it.  We had to learn this skill on the job, and given the crisis-driven nature of school counseling, there just isn’t time to learn college advising skills while we’re putting out so many fires. We need a better foundation.

There are some professional development opportunities for counselors to learn more about the college selection process, but our students need more—and quite frankly, so do we.  Because college programs are very slow to change, it would be most helpful if you would call on all counselor training programs to develop a course in counseling in the college selection process, based on the essential college counseling proficiencies identified by the National Association for College Admission Counseling. These courses already make a difference in the lives of counselors and their students, as counselors feel empowered to help students with college counseling facts and programs they had never been able to use before, because they never knew they existed.

Asking colleges to offer this class would create opportunities for some counselors and their students, and requiring colleges to offer this course would impact all students and families. President Obama has put a high value on a college education; an Executive Order directing all counseling programs to include this course as a degree requirement would send a clear message that the United States is determined to help all students attain the highest level of college awareness and readiness, and significantly advance us towards the 2020 objective.

School counselors have a rich tradition of supporting the goals and needs of our students, a record that helps us realize the importance of asking for help– especially when we need it ourselves.  We long to be of greater service to our students and families by being better trained in college counseling; your support will help us attain that higher level of service.

 

Sincerely,

Patrick J. O’Connor, Ph.D.
Associate Dean of College Counseling, Cranbrook Kingswood School
Past President, National Association for College Admission Counseling

Valerie Strauss covers education and runs The Answer Sheet blog.
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Valerie Strauss · November 14, 2013