Tweet your #fringereviews for the Capital Fringe Festival

We’re looking for a few good tweets.

As the seventh annual Capital Fringe Festival gets underway Thursday — a theater, music and dance extravaganza of more than 130 shows that runs through July 29 — The Post will not only be sending its own team of critics to opine on the wackily diverse offerings. We will also be looking for your take on what you see.


View Photo Gallery: This year’s festival offers another grab bag of DIY theater — from clowns to cabarets to steampunk ballets.

Compose your own witty, thoughtful and of course, succinct reviews of fringe shows on Twitter, using the hashtag #fringereviews, and our crack cadre of drama-obsessed social media mavens will post a selection of the best ones on the Post website each day. Tweet your bliss as well as your loathing. Be funny but not profane. Be curt but not cruel. Have the personal satisfaction of helping to send other theatergoers to the shows you think are worth the time and the outlay of a few bucks. (And as a courtesy to the performers and your fellow theatergoers, don’t tweet during the shows!)

A word to the moms and dads (and sons and daughters and BFFs) of fringe actors, directors and writers: We know you’re proud of your favorite artist’s accomplishments, so when the word “awesome” appears in a tweet, it’s a tipoff to our online detectives that the wheels are being greased for a loved one! The most entertaining (and rewarding) reviews tend to be assessments of work by people you don’t know!.

We’ll keep track of our daily picks from #fringereviews and at the end of the festival, name our absolutely favorite top of the line tweets. Unfortunately, the winners will not get all-expense paid trips around the world. So just for the fun of it, put on your most comfortable shoes and your thinking caps and get out there and tweet!

More on Fringe:

3 acts to catch at the Capital Fringe Festival

Capital Fringe Festival, then and now

Peter Marks joined the Washington Post as its chief theater critic in 2002. Prior to that he worked for nine years at the New York Times, on the culture, metropolitan and national desks, and spent about four years as its off-Broadway drama critic.
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