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Arts Post
Posted at 04:52 PM ET, 05/11/2012

Windows Into DC: Cultural Couture highlights the art and fashion of Washington neighborhoods

One of the neat parts about strolling past the “Windows Into DC: Cultural Couture” display at the Walter E. Washington Convention Center is trying to figure out the neighborhood each window represents.

The blue broken chinaware and vase dress--that’s Chinatown. The donkey in a tuxedo made of newsprint is Capitol Hill. And just approaching the women’s suit made from white tissue paper and high-end shopping bags, you guess Georgetown.


This Chinatown window displays a dress created with chinaware designer Gary Pridgeon in collaboration with menswear designer Andrew Nowell and stylist Stephanie Pharr. Part of the Windows Into DC: Cultural Couture at the Walter E. Washington Convention center through Sept. 30. (Courtesy of Mike B Photography)

The display, which was unveiled Wednesday and runs through Sept. 30, features 11 windows of sculpture and photography and is a partnership between Events DC convention and sports authority, and the D.C. Commission on the Arts and Humanities. It is the third annual iteration of the “Window into DC” series, featured in the perimeter windows of the Convention Center, and focuses on what Christine Brooks-Cropper, president of the Greater Washington Fashion Chamber of Commerce, calls “the art side of fashion.”

The displays hit the landmarks: The Anacostia window has a painting of the Frederick Douglass house and skateboarding phenom Darren Harper, wearing funky moss-covered sneakers, at the RFK skateboard park, sitting on The Chair. The Shaw-U street display features the Lincoln Theater, Ben’s Chili Bowl, and an evening gown made of piano keys.
Designers Andrew Nowell, Gary Pridgeon and stylist Stephanie Parr use periodicals to design this dress in the "Capitol Hill Window." (Courtesy of Mike B Photography)

Greg O’Dell, president and CEO of Events DC, calls the displays a creative interim use for the space that highlights both art and production.

“We’re not trying to be New York or Los Angeles,” Brooks-Cropper says. “We’re D.C. and we wanted to show the identity of each of the neighborhoods.”

Part of the funding for the project goes to support the D.C. Fashion Foundation’s “Fashion Incubator,” a designated workspace for designers in residence.


Left to right: Designers Andrew Nowell and Gary Pridegeon, Lionell Thomas, executive director of the D.C. Commission on the Arts and Humanities, Christine Brooks-Cropper, president of D.C. Fashion Foundation, D.C. Mayor Vincent C. Gray and Designer Holeeta Todd standing in front of the H Street window at the convention center. (Courtesy of Mike B Photography)

By  |  04:52 PM ET, 05/11/2012

Tags:  art

 
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