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The Federal Coach
Posted at 01:39 PM ET, 07/25/2011

Shaking a nightmarish political appointee

We have a political appointee who just doesn’t care about anything except her own self-aggrandizement.  She kicked out or encouraged many of our fantastic management and operations support team to leave, and directly hired her nephew and friends. Now, people are doing work previously done by two or even three people. [Also,] she’s only met with staff twice for a total of 20 minutes over the last two years. 

Morale is at rock-bottom.  The good professionals left are staying only because they believe in the mission so strongly. What can we do? –Anonymous federal employee

With stories like this, it can be hard to remember that most political appointees are well intentioned and hard working.

But, that doesn’t mean that we can ignore the stories about bad leadership. What can you and others like you do if a nightmare scenario like this federal worker’s becomes reality?

First, determine whether the political appointee is actually engaging in illegal or unethical behavior or whether she’s just a bad leader.

If she’s actually done something illegal – like hiring family members inappropriately – you can request a review by your agency’s inspector general or the Office of the Special Council. She might be in violation of the law if she’s hired family, but if another official hired her relatives without any influence by the appointee, that may be perfectly acceptable.

If she is not violating a law or regulations and she’s just a bad leader, here are some next steps that you and your colleagues can take:

· Extend an olive branch. Your appointee may be so overwhelmed by her various responsibilities from spearheading new policies to tackling internal management issues that she is not thinking through decisions. Consider reaching out to the appointee directly or indirectly through some of her closest colleagues to share feedback about implementing best practices or providing assistance. This political may simply be unaware that there’s an issue.

· Phone a friend. But if you suspect she may not take kindly to the feedback, rather than approaching her directly, try consulting with another trusted political appointee or career leader who you believe might influence the situation. They may be able to initiate some changes, such as granting her management responsibilities to other leaders on the team, reassigning her, or perhaps removing her or advising you on concrete coping mechanisms.

· Wait it out. It’s important to remember that most political appointees remain for about 18 to 24 months, so she may be on her way. In that case, you may see a quick turnaround with new political leadership in place.

· Exit stage right. If all else fails, consider looking for an opportunity with another team, office or agency depending on your specific circumstances.

More from On Leadership:

Summer reading suggestions for fed workers

How to become a great federal leader

Rocking the boat in federal agencies

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By  |  01:39 PM ET, 07/25/2011

 
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