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Posted at 11:24 AM ET, 05/17/2011

Americans James Foley and Clare Gillis among four missing journalists to be freed from Libya


Foley: Among four freed in Libya (GlobalPost)
Journalists James Foley and Clare Gillis first went missing after being captured in Libya on April 5.

Since then, family and friends have held vigil, piecing together news on the pair: a sighting in a Tripoli detention camp, a phone call home, a short visit from an intermediary.

Finally, reassuring news came on Tuesday that Foley, a correspondent for Boston-based Global­Post, and Gillis, a contributor to the Atlantic and USA Today, would be released along with two other journalists as early as later that day.


From left to right: Foley, Gillis, Brabo, Hammerl (Screengrab, "Free James Foley and Clare Gillis," Facebook.com)
Along with Foley and Gillis, Libyan government spokesman Moussa Ibrahim said Manu Brabo, a Spanish journalist detained with them, would also be freed. It’s not immediately clear who the fourth journalist is, but photojournalist Anton Hammerl, who has South African and Austrian citizenships, went missing in Libya around the same time. No formal announcement has been given about his status.

Others missing

• Iran Foreign Ministry spokesman Ramin Mehmanparast said in a news conference Tuesday that Al-Jazeera journalist Dorothy Parvaz “violated the law in several cases,” including working as a journalist without “relevant permits.” Parvaz, who was deported to Iran after an initial detainment after arriving in Syria to cover government protests, has been held since April 29. Parvaz holds Iranian, American and Canadian citizenship.

• Freelance journalist Matthew VanDyke has been missing in Libya since March 13, but no official word has ever been given about his capture.

By  |  11:24 AM ET, 05/17/2011

 
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