Posted at 11:06 AM ET, 06/01/2011

Foreign accent syndrome; what scares Google’s Eric Schmidt; and more morning news


It’s summer. Locke Kackley, 8, left center, and sister, Virginia Kackley, 9, right, of Summerville, SC cool off under an outdoor mister in swampy, hot Washington. (Matt McClain/The Washington Post)
WORLD: Egypt’s government didn’t change

“Egypt has been run since 1952 by a military dictatorship. It is still run by a military dictatorship,” Fareed Zakaria speaks about his bleak outlook on Egypt’s revolution.

WORLD: Mladic headed to the Hague

Serbia has handed Bosnian Serb wartime commander Ratko Mladic over to U.N. custody after 16 years as a fugitive. He will appear in court on Friday to face charges of atrocities during the Bosnian civil war. One of the horrific crimes Mladic is accused of overseeing was the murder of 8,000 men and boys in Srebenica. Hours before the massacre, Mladic was caught on camera feigning benevolence, patting a boy on the head and telling him that no one would be hurt. The boys father was later killed. The Associated Press tracked down that boy, now a 24-year-old man. “He should get the biggest sentence possible. He killed my father, my uncle and so many of our people,” Izudin Alic said of Mladic.

ODD: Foreign Accent Syndrome

She went in for dental surgery and came out with a thick foreign accent that’s a combination of British and Irish. Karen Butler never left the United States. It’s a rare condition that usually follows a stroke, not undergoing anesthesia. NPR has her full story.

TECH: What scares Google’s Eric Schmidt

Former Google CEO Eric Schmidt is forever trailed by an interview in which he said Google gets right up to the “creepy line,” but never crosses it. People saw it as a protest-too-much rule — that Google would in fact cross that line to maintain its web domination. However, Schmidt finally explains what he’d see as too creepy: facial recognition paired with mobile tracking.

NATIONAL: Freedom Riders recall their fight

Every time Dion Diamond has to fill out a job application, he has a lot of explaining to do when he gets to the “have you been arrested” section. Diamond has been locked up 30 times — to his best recollection. However, his incarcerations today are looked on as an act of heroism, not of criminal behavior. Diamond and other Freedom Riders, the people who took to public transportation to protest segregation, recall their fight 50 years ago.

WORLD: Gimme Shelter around the world

Playing For Change, a YouTube group films musicians around the world to create international music videos. Their latest gives the world stage to the Rolling Stones:

By  |  11:06 AM ET, 06/01/2011

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