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Posted at 09:35 AM ET, 11/01/2011

Harold Camping admits he may have made a mistake; promises to continue searching

When the end of the world failed to materialize on May 21, and again on Oct. 21, little was heard from Harold Camping, the man who claimed to decipher the Bible and its end date.
Scott Noble, a member of Camping’s congregation, stands in the empty sanctuary May 22. It wasn’t the first time Camping’s prophesies let him down. Noble had also believed the religious leader’s 1994 Rapture prediction. (Brandon Tauszik/Sprinkle Lab)

Camping finally broke his silence on the matter Tuesday, in a five-minute recorded message posted to the Family Radio network. In it, Camping says the mistaken date could be seen as an embarrassment to the Christian network, but he says he continues to search the Bible for answers.

“I am checking my own notes more carefully than ever. There is other language in the Bible, and we still have to look at very carefully. ... We should be very patient about this matter. At least in a minimum way, we are learning to walk more and more humble before God. We are ready to cry out and weep before God, ‘Oh Lord, You have the truth, we don’t have it.’”

His voice seems thicker, and he speaks at a slower rate, possibly due to the stroke he suffered in June.

Camping does not apologize for the prediction-gone-wrong. He does apologize for saying that people who disbelieved in the May 21 Rapture date would not be saved. He also repeats that it’s a lesson from God, and “sometimes it’s painful to learn.”

Camping’s followers donated more than $80 million from 2005 to 2009, a CNN report found. Before the May 21 prediction, some followers gave up their life savings and donated their possessions in preparation for the Rapture.

By  |  09:35 AM ET, 11/01/2011

Tags:  National, Harold Camping, Rapture

 
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