iCloud overtakes computers; Plessy and Ferguson; E. coli confusion

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(Francisco Negroni/AP)

In the above photograph, lightning strikes over the Puyehue volcano, over 500 miles south of Santiago, Chile. About 3,500 people in the nearby area have had to evacuate. The volcano was calm Monday, two days after raining down ash and forcing thousands to flee, although the cloud of soot it had belched out still darkened skies as far away as Argentina. See more photos here.

HISTORY: No more Plessy v. Ferguson

On this date, 119 years ago, Homer Plessy acknowledged he was colored and refused to move from a seat reserved for whites on a train in New Orleans.

Plessy was arrested and brought to trial in a case before the judge John Howard Ferguson. His case led to the U.S. Supreme Court's “separate but equal,” ruling which remained in place until 1954. In a stunning literal example of time healing wounds, two descendants of Plessy and Ferguson, Keith Plessy and Phoebe Ferguson, have come together to form a foundation, Plessy & Ferguson, to highlight historical moments in New Orleans’s struggle for racial equality. Read their story here.

NATIONAL: Weiner admits he lied

After a week of did-he-or-didn’t-he, Rep. Anthony Weiner (D-N.Y.) held a press conference to admit that he did send lewd photographs of himself to women and he didn’t tell the truth when asked last week by reporters. (The whole brouhaha started with a missent direct message on Twitter. I offered up lessons to Weiner last week on how to avoid DM fails. He needed the lessons earlier.)

TECH: Goodbye computer, hello cloud?

Steve Jobs introduced iCloud on Monday, a new service by Apple that will allow consumers “to store vast amounts of music, video, photos and documents on the Web, one of several emerging ‘cloud’ computing offerings that are diminishing the need for a computer,” Liz Flock and Hayley Tsukayama write.

WORLD: E. coli outbreak still a mystery

After Spanish cucumbers and German sprouts were both wrongfully identified as spreading E. coli, in an outbreak that has killed 22 people and infected more than 2,400, officials still do not know the exact cause of the outbreak. The World Health Organization worries that time is running out to find the cause.

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