The Washington Post

Japan earthquake and tsunami, six months later

Residents of Iwanuma, Japan, light a candle at a park during a memorial event Sunday marking six months after the March 11 earthquake and tsunami. (AP)

Yesterday, as the United States mourned the terrorist attacks that hit the country a decade ago, Japan mourned its own loss with a moment of silence, memorial services across the country, and the release of lanterns and balloons into the air, Storyful reports.

One woman in Japan tweeted:

Watch as sky lanterns are released in Fukushima prefecture:

Watch as schoolchildren release 2,127 balloons in Miyagi prefecture:

Tokyo Electric Power Co., the company at the center of the nuclear crisis, released a set of before-and-after photos Sunday of the damaged Fukushima nuclear plants to show how far they have come. See the photos here.

But in some ways, the effects of the disaster can still be felt. On Monday, former chief cabinet secretary Yukio Edano was named Japan’s new trade minister, replacing a politician who resigned over comments about the nuclear crisis that were considered insensitive.

Also Monday, an explosion occurred at a nuclear site in southern France, leading the Associated Press to wonder whether France would engage in the same “soul-searching” about using nuclear power that “swept the world” after Japan’s disaster.


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