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Posted at 08:33 AM ET, 04/09/2012

Mike Wallace, North Korea and Tulsa killings: Morning roundup

Mike Wallace, the longtime “60 Minutes” correspondent who was as feared as he was respected, died on Saturday. He was 93.


Mike Wallace during an interview in New York in 2006. (BEBETO MATTHEWS - AP)
“With his theatrical baritone, he pitched softball questions that could take a sudden detour into an uncomfortable line of questioning meant to sniff out misdeeds or fun gossip,” The Post’s Adam Bernstein writes of Wallace. “He became known as one the most skilled interviewers of the powerful, famous and elusive.”

CBS News chairman Jeff Fager, also executive producer of “60 Minutes,” told the Associated Press that Wallace “loved being Mike Wallace.”

“He knew, and he knew that everybody else knew, that he was going to get to the truth. And that’s what motivated him,” Fager said.

More of your morning links below:

North Korea

North Korea preparing for nuclear test, according to new report released by South Korea. The report uses recent commercial satellite images as evidence of activity at a test site in North Korea’s northeast, where nuclear tests were conducted in 2006 and 2009. The report comes as North Korea plans to launch a rocket into space this week, a launch that appears to violate Pyongyang’s recent vow to stop weapons tests in exchange for food. (The Post)

Tulsa killings

Investigators are probing Facebook comments made by one of two men suspected of killing three black pedestrians in Oklahoma and wounding two more. Suspect Jake England wrote on his page that his father was shot and killed almost two years before Friday’s shooting. He also used a racial slur. (ABC News)

Tulsa police say it is “premature” to describe the murder as a hate crime. Tulsa has a long history of racial tension, including one of the country's most infamous race riots in 1921. (NPR)

Titanic records

More than 200,000 records related to the Titanic have been published online to maerk the 100th anniversary of the ships’ sinking on April 15. The documents includes the official passenger list, which reveals the names, ages and occupations of “the great and the good” who bought tickets to ride the ill-fated ship. (Ancestry)

Syria

An internationally-backed peace plan for Syria appears close to collapse. Just 48 hours before a planned cease-fire, the Syrian government made new demands, including a pledge from rebels to halt attacks. The rebel Free Syrian Army says it no longer the recognizes the authority of the government. (GlobalPost)

By  |  08:33 AM ET, 04/09/2012

Tags:  World, Morning roundup

 
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