wpostServer: http://css.washingtonpost.com/wpost

The Post Most: World

Our Correspondents on Twitter

WorldViews
Anchored by Melissa Bell |  Get Updates: On Twitter Twitter |  On Facebook Facebook |  RSS RSS
Posted at 01:40 PM ET, 08/31/2012

Russian punk band case is over, but bizarre ripple-effects aren’t

The much-documented, tweeted, sung-about and protested trial of three members of the Russian punk band Pussy Riot may be over, but fallout over their controversial sentencing continues.

Three members of the feminist punk band, Maria Alekhina, Nadezhda Tolokonnikova and Yekaterina Samutsevich were convicted of “hooliganism motivated by religious hatred” and sentenced to two years in prison this month for performing an anti-Putin protest song in a Moscow cathedral in February.

Apparently inspired by the gutsy style of their punk-band opponents, groups of Orthodox activists have been staging attacks on liberals in Moscow this week, The New York Times reported.

Several Christian activists broke into a Moscow sex museum Thursday, leaving a brick and a warning that it was the “first stone.” The museum’s director, Alexander Donskoi, previously held a demonstration in support of Pussy Riot near a Moscow shopping center, Interfax reported.

The break-in was captured on security footage:

Earlier, two of the Orthodox activists, Dmitry Tsorionov and Andrey Kaplin, were filmed interrupting a play about the Pussy Riot trial in a Moscow theater, shouting, “Repent!” and “I want to destroy your world and show you that another life is possible.”

They’ve also documented themselves running up to people wearing T-shirts supporting the band and ripping them off:

In an unrelated incident, police arrested a man Friday who confessed to stabbing two women to death in the southwestern Russian city of Kazan. After allegedly killing a 38-year-old woman and her 76-year-old mother earlier this week, university professor Igor Danilevsky scrawled “Free Pussy Riot!” on the wall in blood.


This image made from video provided by the Associated Press Television News shows a sign on a wall written with the blood of two women stabbed to death in the central Russian city of Kazan earlier this month and found Aug. 30, 2012. (Associated Press)

Russian authorities said the message was intended to divert police, and the murder was not related to the punk band’s case.

More world news coverage:

- Amazon forest threat is greater outside Brazil

- China’s coming leadership change met with a shrug

- Journalist reportedly in Syrian custody

- Read more headlines from around the world

By  |  01:40 PM ET, 08/31/2012

Tags:  World

 
Read what others are saying
     

    © 2011 The Washington Post Company