Posted at 01:01 PM ET, 08/08/2012

Satellite images show bombardment in Syrian city of Aleppo

A handful of satellite images released by Amnesty International on Wednesday show the degree of artillery bombing in Aleppo, where members of the Free Syrian Army are engaged in a vicious battle with forces loyal to Syrian President Bashar al-Assad.

The first photo, below, shows yellow dots that indicate over 600 craters, most likely from artillery shelling, in Anadan. The images were collected over a period of a week, from July 23 to Aug. 1.


More than 600 probable artillery impact craters, represented here with yellow dots, were identified in Anadan, in the vicinity of Aleppo. (Photo: Digital Globe via Amnesty International)

A second satellite image gives an overview of military activity in Aleppo from July 23 to Aug. 1, showing the positions of military checkpoints, roadblocks and locations of artillery.


This image map provides an overview of the activity seen in Aleppo. (Photo: Digital Globe via Amnesty International)

A slightly closer look at another image shows possible craters from artillery fire, around a residential housing complex in the town of Anadan.


This July 31, 2012 image shows places where probable artillery impact craters have been identified. (Photo: Digital Globe via Amnesty International)

Other images posted online show people lining up at gas stations to buy cooking gas and vehicle fuel as well as trucks on fire at road intersections in Aleppo.

According to Reuters, forces loyal to Assad have been able to push the rebels back in Aleppo, signaling that government forces have launched a fresh offensive in an attempt to move rebels out of major parts of the city.

See photos from Aleppo, as fighting escalates.

Read more stories from our Syria coverage:

- Syrian rebels feel abandoned by U.S.

- Decoys part of dramatic defection of Syrian PM

- Syrian PM shown with rebels before escape

- Read more stories from around the world

By  |  01:01 PM ET, 08/08/2012

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