wpostServer: http://css.washingtonpost.com/wpost2
Posted at 01:23 PM ET, 10/25/2011

Thailand’s flooding complicated by crocodile problem

As Bangkok steels itself for massive flooding, a different kind of problem has also presented itself: scores of crocodiles and alligators on the loose.


Two residents ride on a boat with a crocodile after it was killed at a flooded residential area in an area north of Bangkok on Sunday. (Apichart Weerawong - Associated Press)
Thailand, which is home to more crocodiles than any other country and supplies gator and croc skins to the rest of the world, saw many of its reptiles escape large ranching farms when the torrential rain started several months ago.

The government’s solution: A reward of 1,000 baht ($33) to anyone who catches a reptile on the loose. A poll on the Bangkok Post shows a majority of voters think a monetary reward is an insufficient solution. But the photos below show some people have taken the government up on its offer.

The government has also set up a hotline for those who see crocodiles, alligators, tigers, snakes or scorpions on the loose and need help wrangling them.

The New York Daily News reports that there have so far been no attacks on Thai citizens by roaming reptiles.

The flooding, however, has killed 340 people since July.

See photos of the croc catching below:


Residents carry a crocodile being caught and killed at a flooded residential area north of Bangkok on Sunday. (Apichart Weerawong - Associated Press)

A man carries a crocodile on his shoulder after it was caught and killed at a flooded residential area north of Bangkok on Sunday. (Apichart Weerawong - Associated Press)

A tied-up crocodile lies dead in a boat after it was seized in floodwaters and shot by authorities in the hard-hit Bang Bua Thong district in suburban Bangkok. (Khaosod newspaper - AFP/Getty Images)

Residents carry a crocodile from a flooded area on the outskirts of Bangkok on Sunday. (Reuters)

By  |  01:23 PM ET, 10/25/2011

Tags:  World, Thailand, flooding, crocodiles

 
Read what others are saying
     

    © 2011 The Washington Post Company