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Posted at 04:15 PM ET, 08/02/2012

The best parts of the Russian punk rockers trial, in tweets

It’s a rare trial in which the defense is asked if they like modern art, if they have “head trauma” and if they listen to their parents. As the trial of Russian punk rockers Pussy Riot stretches on, social media posts by reporters and others inside the courtroom offer a window into the often-bizarre proceedings, with courtroom visitors reportedly threatened that they will be kicked out if they continue laughing.

Three of the band’s members, Nadezhda Tolokonnikova, Maria Alekhina and Yekaterina Samutsevich face up to seven years in prison for performing what they called a “punk prayer” against Russian President Vladi­mir Putin in February in a Moscow cathedral. Speaking with reporters in London on Thursday, Putin said the verdict should not be “too severe,” but he added that their stunt “was no good.”

The three now sit in a glass cage in the Moscow courtroom for their three-week trial, on charges of hooliganism driven by “religious hatred,” the AP reports. An excellent play-by-play of the proceedings comes from the Guardian’s Miriam Elder on Twitter.

Monday, day one of the trail, opened with statements from the women about their intentions for the cathedral performance.

In February, the Patriarch of Moscow met with Putin and expressed confidence in his win, and he later referred to the Russian president as “Russia’s legitimate leader.”

On the second day, a witness from the church where the performance was staged said she took offense at the women’s outfits, which consisted of colorful sundresses and balaklavas.

We also learned some interesting facts about Russian courts:

And heard more about the protests that were taking place outside:

Celebrities, including musicians Pete Townshend, Corinne Bailey Rae and members of Franz Ferdinand, have also come out in support of the band.

On Thursday, Katya Samutsevich's father was called, and the strange lines of questioning commenced. He was asked whether Samutsevich was obedient, whether she attends church and what her tastes in art were.

According to reports from Rapsi News, Samutsevich’s father refused to answer the art question.

Click here to see more photos from the trial:

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- Read more headlines from around the world

By  |  04:15 PM ET, 08/02/2012

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