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Posted at 12:26 PM ET, 05/27/2011

Using ‘Bronze’ app, artist releases new single that changes with every listen


One of the many incarnations of “Flesh Freeze” (Screengran from Gwilym Gold’s Web site )
True music fans admire those musicians most who never play a song the same way in concert twice. Musicians like the Grateful Dead, Jimi Hendrix, and Led Zeppelin, whose songs continued to inspire because they have new riffs, or go in new directions at each performance.

But what if fans could listen to a recorded single in a different way every time? What if the lyrics played in a different order, or the drumbeat went missing or got louder? What if it was the same song, but it didn’t begin where it used to?

The first solo single out of musician and ex-Golden Silvers frontman Gwilym Gold, “Flesh Freeze,” can do just that, according to Wired.

Using a new downloadable app format called Bronze, “Flesh Freeze” is able to provide fans with slightly altered musical components on each listen.

Bronze works around a waveform, and was invented by Gold, along with producer Lexxx (who produced Wild Beasts and Björk) and a team of scientists from Goldsmiths University in London, who call it a “non-interactive format in which recorded material is transformed in real time, generating a unique and constantly evolving interpretation of the song on each listen.”

Gold even promises that there is no way to listen a version you’ve already heard.

Music aficianados have become used to intelligent music players, like Pandora, which cater to a listener’s music tastes. But the idea of a song so intelligent that it changes with every listen — catering not to our tastes but instead to our cravings for something fresh — is something new altogether.

Listen to the hypnotic song “Flesh Freeze” below, and then download your own version. And then another version, if you so please.

Gwilym Gold Bronze Preview from Gwilym Gold on Vimeo.

By  |  12:26 PM ET, 05/27/2011

 
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