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Capital Business
Posted at 04:39 PM ET, 11/29/2012

Deltek CEO to depart

Herndon-based Deltek said Thursday that Kevin T. Parker, the company’s chief executive, will leave next week and Mike Corkery, Deltek’s chief financial officer, will become acting CEO.

The news follows Deltek’s purchase earlier this year by private equity firm Thoma Bravo for $1.1 billion. At the time, Deltek’s leadership said the company would maintain its executive team and its Herndon headquarters.

The previously public company had been majority owned by private-equity firm New Mountain Capital. New Mountain invested in Deltek in 2005 and brought Parker on shortly after.

Deltek has been best known for providing software to government contractors, but under Parker’s leadership, the company expanded into offering them market research and helping them form teams to compete for work.
In recent years, the company purchased Planview’s MPM division, which makes project management software, and Reston-based mySBX, an online network that allows government contractors and professionals to find partners and publish opportunities.

Deltek also bought Input and FedSources, which had been competing against each other to offer market analysis services to contractors.

Under Parker, Deltek consolidated into a Herndon office, where he — like the company’s other employees — had a cubicle, rather than a closed office.

By  |  04:39 PM ET, 11/29/2012

 
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