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Capital Business
Posted at 12:09 PM ET, 03/12/2012

Developers, schools line up for shot at Stevens Elementary

Six development teams and six educational organizations have submitted proposals to the District government for a shot at redeveloping
Stevens Elementary School in the District’s West End. (The Washington Post)
Stevens Elementary School, on 21st Street NW in the West End.

The six development teams are all headed by groups that have done work in the area:

• Akridge, developer of Burnham Place

• Capstone Development, developer of the convention center hotel

• Donohoe Development

• EastBanc, developers of myriad housing projects in the West End and Georgetown

• Lincoln Property Co.

• MRP Realty, which is refurbishing Washington Harbour

The District tried and failed to previously develop Stevens, which closed under then-mayor Adrian Fenty, but Fenty’s selection of Equity Residential didn’t sit well with West End residents. This effort represents another try under Mayor Vincent C. Gray and Deputy Mayor Victor Hoskins.

Rather than just seek development partners, Hoskins also asked for educational groups interested in space to respond. Six made submissions, mostly charter schools:

• AppleTree Institute for Education Innovation

• Dorothy I. Height Community Academy Public Charter School (CAPCS)

• Eagle Academy Public Charter School (EAPCS)

• GEMS Americas; Urban Atlantic Education; The Robert Bobb Group

• Ivymount Schools and Programs

• Living Classrooms of the National Capital Region.

All of the responses must be vetted by the District before they will be considered as possible partners and ultimately developing Stevens will require a lengthy public meeting process and legislation from the D.C. Council.

Just as he told us in January, real estate magnate and heavyweight political fundraiser R. Donahue Peebles decided not to bid this time, despite coveting and studying the building for years.

Follow Jonathan O’Connell on Twitter: @oconnellpostbiz

By  |  12:09 PM ET, 03/12/2012

Tags:  Stevens Elementary School, Victor Hoskins

 
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