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Posted at 04:15 PM ET, 04/22/2011

PM Update: Dismal Friday night, warmer Saturday

But rain showers possible early & late

What a gross, miserable Friday afternoon. It’s felt more like late February than late April as our rain has been accompanied by temperatures in the mid-to-upper 40s. I’ve even heard reports of sleet as close by as Baltimore. Rain continues tonight, but after a warm front pushes to our north, we should enjoy a dry interval for part of Saturday morning and afternoon. However, rain may return later in the day.


Radar & lightning: Latest regional radar shows movement of precipitation and lightning strikes over past two hours. Refresh page to update. Click here or on image to enlarge. Or see radar bigger on our Weather Wall.

Through Tonight: Periods of light rain are likely, with temperatures holding steady around where they are now. That means raw mid-40s for overnight lows. Winds are from the east at 10 mph. Additional rainfall may be another 0.1-0.2” or so.

Tomorrow (Saturday): The morning isn’t looking too promising, with a 50-60% chance of some lingering light rain, especially early. By mid-to-late morning, the rain may begin to taper and skies brighten as a warm front lifts to our north. The afternoon presents the best opportunity for some drying, and maybe even some sunshine, with highs from the upper 60s to mid-70s depending on the amount of sunshine we can muster. The highest temps and most abundant sunshine will be to the south. By late in the day, as a cold front approaches from the northwest, scattered showers and thunderstorms could develop (30% chance), with the best chance in the northwest suburbs (Montgomery/Frederick counties).

See Camden Walker’s forecast through early next week. And if you haven’t already, join us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

Tropics: The disturbance north of Puerto Rico and south of Bermuda continues to spin but has yet to be named the first tropical or subtropical storm of 2011, or “Arlene”. The National Hurricane Center says there’s a 20 percent chance that could happen by tomorrow, after which the window of opportunity for further development ends as the system moves into a hostile environment.

By  |  04:15 PM ET, 04/22/2011

Categories:  Forecasts

 
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