PM Update: Glorious weather for another day

There’s not a lot to say about today except that it was simply sublime. We had just the right combination of sensational sunshine and blissfully low humidity. An outstanding evening lies ahead to be followed by a marvelously refreshing morning and awesome afternoon. How’s that for a superlative packed twenty-four hour forecast?

Through Tonight: Contemplating spending some time outdoors this evening? Do it. Temperatures steadily drop into the 70s under mostly clear skies. By morning, everyone at least dips into the mid-to-upper 60s (downtown) with mid-50s in the cooler suburbs.

Tomorrow (Friday): One more day of delightfully dry air and ample sunshine. After an almost crisp start, afternoon temperatures warm into the upper 80s - almost hot in the sun. But a cool breeze coming in from the north at 5-10 mph should take a slight edge off the peak afternoon heat.

See David Streit’s forecast through early next week. And if you haven’t already, join us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

Pollen update from Walter Reed: “Tree pollen is LOW at 0.32 gr/cubic meter. Grass pollen is LOW (NAB range) at 4.15 gr/cubic meter which is more moderate for our area. Weed pollen is MODERATE (NAB range) at 16.61 gr/cubic meter which is in the High range for our area weed count. Mold spores are MODERATE at 9851.78 spores/cubic meter.”

Dallas 100+ streak ends: After hitting 100 for forty straight days in the Big-D, the mercury failed to reach the century mark this afternoon - falling two days short of the all-time record for 100+ days, set in 1980.

Costliest hurricanes: A new report (PDF) documenting “The Deadliest, Costliest, and Most Intense Tropical Cyclones” has been released NOAA. Stu Ostro at weather.com has a nice blog post summarizing its key findings. Here’s an excerpt: “Most notably, the estimate of direct damage produced by Hurricane Katrina is now $108 billion. As if the previous estimate of $81B wasn’t stunning enough! That makes Katrina the first hundred billion dollar hurricane.”

Jason is currently the Washington Post’s weather editor. A native Washingtonian, Jason has been a weather enthusiast since age 10.
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