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Posted at 04:04 PM ET, 11/23/2011

PM Update: I’m dreaming of a fine Thanksgiving

It was a bit of a wild weather morning as showers in advance of a cold front were followed by strong gusty winds. Conditions trended “better” midday into the afternoon, at least with a few breaks overhead, but it’s still quite windy and there’s a remnant shower threat until the upper-level energy passes to our east later this evening. We’ve got a mighty fine Thanksgiving Day ahead though, and it gets even better by Black Friday.

Through Tonight: We can’t rule out a shower or two until the last vestiges of the storm pass off to our east later this evening and overnight. Anything that falls should be pretty light and perhaps rather hit-or-miss. Winds, still raging early, should begin to die down once we get past mid-to-late evening. Gusts as high as 40 mph (even higher in the hills north and west) weaken toward sustained around 10 mph late night. Lows should dip to near freezing in the coldest spots while they stay closer to 40 degrees downtown.

Tomorrow (Thanksgiving): Near perfect? Looks like the only real downside is a continuing wind, but compared to today it won’t be that terrible. This could be one of those days when you have to struggle to find a cloud as highs shoot for the upper 50s most spots.

See Dan Stillman’s forecast through the weekend. And if you haven’t already, join us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter .

Joplin tornado: With at least 159 directly killed by the event, the EF-5 Joplin tornado was easily one of the worst small-scale natural disasters in recent memory. Now, The Weather Channel’s severe weather expert Greg Forbes has come to a conclusion, based on his analysis, that the tornado was the third worst on record in the United States. He looked at both the loss of life and property to come to this conclusion. In addition, he ranks three of this years tornadoes, including two on April 27 as the worst in the country since the use of radar became typical in the 1950s.

By  |  04:04 PM ET, 11/23/2011

Categories:  Forecasts

 
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