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Posted at 04:15 PM ET, 09/26/2011

PM Update: Still lots of clouds around, and more rain showers on the way

I don’t really have any new way to describe that it remains pretty cloudy. Instead, let’s focus on the breaks of sun. They are pretty awesome when they show up! I hope you got to enjoy some rays today. Still, those high levels of humidity are not too enjoyable, but at least temperatures are not bad, with highs rising to near 80.

Through Tonight: The evening is probably dry, and it may stay that way through the night. Though, of course, clouds stick around. Late night fog is possible in typically foggy locations and the overall cloud cover should thicken as well as it has over recent times. We’ve got just an outside (20-30%) chance of a shower most of the night, but odds increase heading into morning. Lows reach the mid-60s to near 70.

Tomorrow (Tuesday): Showers are likely (60% chance) at times during the day, probably focused on the midday, but that means raindrops are possible as soon as the morning and then into the afternoon. On the whole it should not be super heavy, though downpours are possible in this moist air mass and it won’t take much to lead to flash flooding. Highs should rise to right around 80 throughout the area.

See Jason Samenow’s forecast through the weekend. And if you haven’t already, join us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter .

Waterspout outbreak: You know that pesky low to our west that’s been screwing up our weather? It helped create numerous waterspouts over Lake Michigan over the weekend as well. Cold air aloft (thanks to the low-pressure system) mixed with warm water in the lake to create unstable conditions. Add in some spin to the atmosphere, and you’ve got waterspouts. Check out NWS Milwaukee’s description and see photos here and here.

Tornado recovery boosts economy: Alabama’s construction industry was struggling prior to the April 27 tornado outbreak. Since then, it’s been a boom. A new report from the Center for Business at the University of Alabama states that between $2.6 and $4.2 billion will be spent on reconstruction efforts.

By  |  04:15 PM ET, 09/26/2011

Categories:  Forecasts

 
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