Weather, storms to spur Christmas holiday travel troubles

Denver (Thursday) may be city most affected by weather issues

A series of storms tracking across the country promises to cause disruptions for holiday travelers. Fortunately, these storms will not produce widespread crippling snow amounts or dangerous thunderstorm outbreaks. But they will produce enough inclement weather to pose problems in the Rockies, New Mexico, the South, and East Coast between Thursday and Christmas Day.

THURSDAY TROUBLE SPOTS


Snowfall potential in Colorado through Thursday afternoon

This same storm plunges into New Mexico Thursday and Thursday night. Accumulating snow of several inches may fall in Albuquerque and Sante Fe, causing delays there. A winter storm watch has been posted. Travel disruption potential: MODERATE-HIGH


Thunderstorm potential on Thursday. Slight risk of severe storms in yellow. General thunderstorm risk in green. (NOAA)

THURSDAY PM & FRIDAY AM TROUBLE SPOTS

The threat of some locally heavy downpours from the southern storm rapidly heads east and northeast. Cities potentially impacted include Nashville, Richmond, Washington, D.C., Philadelphia and New York City. Travel disruption potential: LOW-MODERATE


Probability of at least 1” of snow, mainly Thursday night and Friday morning. (NOAA)

FRIDAY PM TROUBLE SPOTS

The weather across much of the lower 48 looks pretty tranquil. Travel disruption potential: NONE

CHRISTMAS EVE TROUBLE SPOTS

The quiet weather pattern likely persists over much of the country. An area of low pressure may produce some rain showers in eastern Texas affecting Dallas and Houston. Travel disruption potential: LOW

CHRISTMAS DAY TROUBLE SPOTS

The wave of low pressure pushes across the Southeast, bringing a chance of rain showers from Louisiana into North Carolina. Whereas previous forecasts had indicated a storm might form and come up the East Coast with the potential for rain and snow in the mid-Atlantic and Northeast, this looks less likely. Travel disruption potential: LOW

Jason is currently the Washington Post’s weather editor. A native Washingtonian, Jason has been a weather enthusiast since age 10.

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