The spring equinox from space

At 7:02 a.m. this morning, spring officially sprung.  Just 43 minutes later, NOAA’s GOES-13 satellite acquired this beautiful view of Earth.


At 7:45 ET, the GOES-13 satellite captured this full disk image of Earth. (NOAA)

The spring equinox signifies the moment in time in which equal amounts of the sun’s energy reaches the northern and southern hemisphere. The even distribution of light is evident in the above image posted by NOAA’s Environmental Visualization Laboratory.

(Note: the sun in the above image was artificially superimposed).

Also, here’s a cool video of the changing seasons – both the equinoxes and solstices – from space, via NASA:

For more information on the spring equinox, see this post by CWG’s Justin Grieser:

First day of spring 2013: The sun says new season, despite lingering winter cold for some

Jason is currently the Washington Post’s weather editor. A native Washingtonian, Jason has been a weather enthusiast since age 10.
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Jason Samenow · March 20, 2013