Mind-boggling views of beastly ocean storm offshore eastern New England, Canada


(NASA)

Call it a beast, a monster, a meteorological bomb, or a behemoth. The extreme storm offshore eastern New England and slamming the Canadian Maritimes is all of those things.

WeatherBell meteorologist Ryan Maue estimates the storm’s (integrated kinetic) energy is four times that of superstorm Sandy, based on its enormity and power.

As predicted, the storm literally exploded overnight, its pressure crashing from the levels of a pedestrian mid-latitude storm (1002 millibars) to a category 3 hurricane (around 964 millibars). And its pressure is still falling.

The storm has absolutely raked extreme eastern Massachusetts, with hurricane force wind gusts up to 82 mph logged in Nantucket (the strongest since at least the March 1993 Superstorm and Hurricane Bob in 1991) and up to 10 inches of snow.

Buoys offshore coastal Maine (in the Bay of Fundy) have recorded gusts exceeding 100 (including a 111 mph gust):

Pictures speak louder than words, so let’s take a look at this thing; some serious meteorological eye candy here:

Satellite images

1. Color water vapor view


(NASA)

2. Visible wide-view


(NOAA)

3. Visible portrait view


(NOAA)

4. The biggest storm in the world

5. Side by side: Water vapor and visible view

6. Lightning in the storm along occluded front ( + and – symbols)


(CIMSS)

7. It’s huge, extending into the Caribbean

8. Double vortex in the center!

9. Loop of storm center – close-up (Link, via CIMSS)

10. Just spectacular


(NASA)

11. High resolution view from Suomi-NPP satellite


(Colorado State University)

12. NASA MODIS high resolution image

Weather visualizations

1. Incredibly tightly packed pressure field (contours of equal pressure or isobars), indicative of strong winds


(Brad Panovich via Facebook)

 2. Amazing simulation of surface winds

3. Hurricane force winds apparent in this model simulation

4. Deep reds show large area of strong winds

5. Giant ocean waves predicted tonight (30-50 feet!)


Wave watch model projection 2 a.m. Thursday morning EDT (WeatherBell.com)

On the ground: photos/video

1. Nantucket scene

2. Nantucket frozen over

3. Nantucket: Harbor Square under water

4. Halifax scene

5. Halifax white-out

6. Video from Halifax

7. Waves crash into Scituate, Mass.

Link: Nova Scotia Live Webcam

Jason is currently the Washington Post’s weather editor. A native Washingtonian, Jason has been a weather enthusiast since age 10.
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Jason Samenow · March 26