Double trouble for Mexico as tropical cyclones flank the country


Enhanced satellite imagery of Tropical Storm Norbert and Post-Tropical Cyclone Dolly on Wednesday morning. (Brian McNoldy via Facebook)

Along its Gulf coast, Mexico is being inundated with rainfall from former Tropical Storm Dolly, while to the west, the Baja California peninsula is preparing for the arrival of Tropical Storm Norbert, which is expected to brush by the peninsula as a hurricane.

Dolly, which was named as a tropical storm early Tuesday morning, has since dissipated over the mountainous terrain of Mexico after making landfall Tuesday night.

The National Hurricane Center issued its final update on Dolly at 11 a.m. ET, warning that further heavy rainfall could be expected. An additional three to six inches could fall, and storm totals could reach 20 inches in the higher elevations.


Visible satellite image of Tropical Storm Norbert on Tuesday. (U.S. Naval Research Laboratory)

In the eastern Pacific, Tropical Storm Norbert is just getting its legs. Satellite imagery shows the tropical storm developing the first stages of an eye.

Norbert is approaching hurricane strength on Tuesday, with maximum sustained winds of 65 mph and minimum central pressure of 995 mb. Tropical storm watches and warnings are in effect, and the National Hurricane Center expects that a hurricane watch will be issued later on Tuesday for the southern Baja California Peninsula.


Past and forecast tracks for Tropical Storm Norbert (left) and post-tropical cyclone Dolly (right). (Weather Underground)

Norbert is expected to track northwest along the coast of Mexico, bringing heavy rain, large waves, and strong rip currents. The tropical storm is forecast to strengthen to a category 2 hurricane with winds of 105 mph by Thursday morning.

Norbert’s outer rain bands have already reached the southern Baja California peninsula on Tuesday afternoon, as seen from some resort webcams:


A cloudy resort webcam in Cabo San Lucas as Tropical Storm Norbert approaches. (Weather Underground)
Angela Fritz is an atmospheric scientist and The Post's deputy weather editor.
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