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Posted at 01:55 PM ET, 09/29/2011

The Michael Jackson death trial: Is it too upsetting to follow?


Conrad Murray during opening arguments for the trial. (Reuters)

It’s Day 3 of the involuntary manslaughter trial of Conrad Murray — or, as CNN is currently calling it, the Michael Jackson Death Trial — and already the details coming out during court proceedings are very personal, upsetting and sometimes both.

This morning, Alberto Alvarez, Jackson’s logistics director, testified about the medical equipment attached to Jackson at the time of his death (including a catheter) and how Jackson’s daughter Paris screamed for her daddy after his almost lifeless body was initially discovered. This all happened while the jury — and anyone watching on television or online — got to see dim photos of the bedroom suite where Jackson reportedly overdosed on propofol.

This comes on the heels of testimony from Day 2 that offered further descriptions of the Jackson children’s grief, and opening arguments that revealed a photograph of Jackson’s dead body and audio of the singer slurring his words and sounding overmedicated.

Based on images of the signs some fans are holding outside the L.A. courthouse (see below), some of the King of Pop’s many admirers feel this trial is necessary to finally get justice in his premature death. But pursuing all the details of the case in an open court of law has, inevitably, dredged up intimate details that the public probably does not need to know.


(Jason Redmond - AP)

Given all that, are you following the Conrad Murray/Michael Jackson trial? Will you only pay attention once a verdict is reached? Or are you shutting your eyes and ears to the entire case because his death remains too painful (and, at times, unseemly) to explore?

Please weigh in with a comment.

By  |  01:55 PM ET, 09/29/2011

Categories:  Michael Jackson

 
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