Just put it down for a second. (Justin Sullivan/Getty Images) Just put it down for a second. (Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

They might be letting us keep our phones on aboard airplanes — during takeoff, taxi and landing, even.

The Federal Aviation Administration is looking into it, considering draft recommendations from an advisory group, which now just until September to finalize.

As The Post noted, “Currently, the use of all electronic devices is banned at the start and end of flights, a prohibition that increasingly irritates passengers who are ever more dependent on constant access to their computers, smartphones, digital music devices and e-readers.”

That’s an understatement.

Come on, FAA, must you really allow this? It seems increasingly clear that the justification for keeping phones off on planes is, well, a bit thin. And I know it will make Alec Baldwin happy. But being on the plane is one of the four times I look into another human face.

The other ones are when my phone runs out of battery, on jogs and at family dinners, but only under duress and because I swear I can work the screen by touch underneath the table. Other than that, I never have to look away. In fact, I’m getting pretty good at jogging while staring unblinkingly at my phone screen in case George Lucas wants to start following me on Twitter or something. I very, very seldom run into trees head-on, and never very big trees.

Sometimes it’s nice, though, to be forced to read a physical book, or to cough disapprovingly at the baby beside you in real time rather than just passive-aggressively subtweeting it. This is what politeness is — to submit to a minor inconvenience gracefully, rather than, say, reaching across the table to seize large hunks of meat with your bare hands.

I don’t understand the people who object to cellphones on planes on the ground that they can’t bear the idea of people yakking into them for an entire flight. The only place that people yak into phones any more is right next to you on long train journeys, even in the Quiet Car.

Alexandra Petri writes the ComPost blog, offering a lighter take on the news and opinions of the day.
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