Folks and gentlefolks, we have our winner.

The battle has been long and pitched and very, very awkward, but here we stand. We are not waving at someone who was not waving at us. We have passed the age of tween and endured a date that was not a date that concluded with a handshake instead of a kiss or hug. [Name] was typing, but now [Name] has entered text, and it is for us to let it be written.

Here is your winner: Forgetting the name of only one of two people you are introducing to each other.

It took down conversation in the restroom, talking to someone who wasn’t talking to you, leaving someone hanging for a high five and the perennial classic: When only one of you thinks it’s a date, to defeat “Telling a joke and no one laughs” in the final round.

Here is its progress.

Some general observations:

1) Old-timey, traditional person-to-person awkward moments seem to beat out technology-based or social-media-linked awkward moments. Liking a Facebook status that should not be Liked went out in the first round. This could reflect the age of the people taking the quiz! Or these could just be that in-person awkwardness has been and remains the most awkward kind.

2) High-concepts (the ’80s or Life, say) tended to fare worse than specific examples (Start laughing at inappropriate time; can’t stop).

3) There were some upsets. I expected “Wave at someone who wasn’t waving at you” to go farther. “Hearing your own voice,” also a strong contender, went out sooner than expected.

4) I have been informed by my livechatters that Restroom Conversation was misleading, since in men’s rooms it is basically verboten, whereas in ladies’ rooms, it is mildly awkward but not crushingly so. Other categories might have suffered from gender differences as well.

5) The final winner was an awkward moment with two “victims” — the person forgetting the name, and the person whose name is forgotten. Perhaps compassion factored into the cringe?

Congratulations, UConn and Forgetting the name of only one of two people you are introducing to each other. Well played.

Alexandra Petri writes the ComPost blog, offering a lighter take on the news and opinions of the day.