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Posted at 06:09 PM ET, 02/01/2013

D.C. man shot during alleged kidnapping bid is charged with killing attacker

A 23-year-old man who authorities said was the target of a robbery and kidnapping two months ago in Southeast Washington, and who was shot as he fought back, has been charged with first-degree murder, according to D.C. police.

Charging documents filed in D.C. Superior Court say the man, James Brown, ended up in the same Prince George’s County hospital as one of the men who authorities said was involved in the attack.

Police said Brown, of Southeast Washington, told a witness “that the dude that robbed and kidnapped him was in the bed next to him,” the court documents say.

That man, identified as Javon Hale, 18, has been charged with kidnapping while armed in the Dec. 29 incident involving Brown, and with assault with intent to kill in a shooting that left a man critically wounded Dec. 26.

Hale is also facing a murder charge in a fatal shooting in 2010 of a day laborer in what police described as an attempt to steal the victim’s truck. That man, Manuel Sanchez, had just finished hauling trash from a vacant apartment building slated to be redeveloped.

A judge in November released Hale into a high-intensity supervision program. The teenager had spent nearly two years awaiting trial, which is now scheduled for this fall. He was monitored by GPS, but only during the hours of his curfew, 10 p.m. to 6 a.m.

The crimes D.C. police charged Hale with committing occurred during the day. The Dec. 29 incident happened in the 5000 block of Ayers Place Southeast, when police allege that Hale and Darnell Rivers, 22, kidnapped Brown, perhaps to hold him for ransom, according to court documents.

But police said Brown also had a gun, and the three men opened fire inside a gray Mazda. Police said Rivers was killed and both Hale and Brown were wounded. Hale is charged with kidnapping Brown and Brown is charged with killing Rivers.

By  |  06:09 PM ET, 02/01/2013

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