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Posted at 12:16 PM ET, 09/21/2011

Sulaimon Brown reaches deal over records sought by D.C. Council

Sulaimon Brown and lawyers for a D.C. Council special committee will not appear in Superior Court Wednesday after reaching an agreement over records the former mayoral candidate turned over to the FBI and U.S. Attorney’s Office.

Brown, who says the Gray campaign paid and promised a city job to disparage then-mayor Adrian M. Fenty during last year’s election, had declined to give the committee the records. He said he did not have the documents because they had been subpoenaed by federal authorities. But last week, James Rudasill Jr., his attorney, revealed at a hearing that documents had recently been returned to Brown.

Superior Court Judge Judith Macaluso ruled last week that Brown would have two days to review the records and then give access to the special committee, which is investigating the hiring practices of Mayor Vincent C. Gray’s administration. Leah Gurowitz, a spokeswoman for the court, said in an e-mail that a hearing scheduled for Wednesday had been canceled because Brown and the committee were in agreement.

Meanwhile, Brown was in Municipal Court Tuesday in a dispute with his landlord, who has accused him of squatting in his Northeast apartment. In his response, Brown said he signed a lease in 2008. Brown had a copy of a lease, showing that he was to pay $1,100 per month.

Brown said in an interview that the landlord owes him $4,000, and agreed Wednesday to go into mediation with the landlord.

Brown, who has had several run-ins with law enforcement, is scheduled to appear in court next month on charges of driving on a suspended Maryland driver’s license and failure to obey.

Police are also investigating items -- a police placard and a retractable baton -- that he had in his car during the traffic stop that led to the charges last week.

According to city personnel records, Brown once worked as a police officer at the University of the District of Columbia. Brown has said he bought the placard at an FOP gift shop.

By  |  12:16 PM ET, 09/21/2011

 
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