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Posted at 03:38 PM ET, 12/05/2011

New Web site for disabled public transportation riders

There’s a new Web site for those who have special transportation needs. The site is called Reach A Ride and can be found at www.reacharide.org, or its services can be used through its toll-free number, 855-732-2427.

The site is launched by the National Capital Region Transportation Planning Board and is meant to provide information for “travelers with special needs in the region,” according to a news release.

The information is designed to provide specialized transportation options in Maryland, Virginia and the District for people with disabilities, older adults or those with limited English proficiency, according to the release.

“In this region alone, there are approximately 550,000 persons with a disability; 520,000 over the age of 65; 510,000 with limited English proficiency; and 810,000 living in low-income earning households,” said D.C. Council member Muriel Bowser (D-Ward 4), who serves as chair of the Transportation Planning Board, in a release.

Glenn Millis, Metro’s director of American with Disabilities Act programs, said in a release that the new Web site is meant to give those with specialized transportation needs more choices than MetroAccess, the door-to-door service for disabled riders.

“Reach a Ride complements the goals we have at Metro to ensure the highest level of independence for our customers with disabilities, which is why Metro helped fund this critical information resource,” Millis said.

The contract for running MetroAccess is set to expire and will be rebid in June 2013. Metro has been seeking input from riders about how to improve its service.

Disabled riders on Metro say they often face broken escalators, long waits for rides on shuttle service, poor lighting and rundown station platforms.

Follow me on Twitter @postmetrogirl.

By  |  03:38 PM ET, 12/05/2011

 
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