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http://www.washingtonpost.com/2010/07/06/ABMK8PP_linkset.html
The Early Lead
Posted at 06:19 AM ET, 11/28/2011

After Jason Witten collided with Cowboys cheerleader, her Twitter account disappears

Updated with Cowboys’ response

The Dallas Cowboys didn’t really force cheerleader Melissa Keller to delete her Twitter account after she was bowled over by Jason Witten in the Cowboys’ Thanksgiving Day game, did they?

That would seem like such an uncharacteristic move for this quiet, self-effacing team that prefers to just go about its business in Texas with no national attention whatsoever and would never ever market its cheerleaders or, say, allow auditions to be made into a TV show.

Yet that’s what CNBC’s Darren Rovell says is exactly what happened after Kellerman, a 22-year-old from South Carolina, tweeted twice after her sideline collision — she was unhurt — with Witten. The team, on Monday, denied ordering her to kill the account. “The Dallas Cowboys Fotoball Club did not. We don’t get involved in administering Twitter accounts,” Rich Dalrymple, vice president of public relations and communications, told Dallas’ CBS affiliate.

Which, frankly, is more in line with what we’d expect from the Cowboys.

Shame on the Cowboys for pulling cheerleader @MelissaRae off Twitter. Not allowing these girls to capitalize is criminal.Fri Nov 25 20:50:26 via Twitter for iPhone

Immediately after the game, the team declined to make her available for interviews. Then she tweeted innocently enough on an account that has since been deleted:

“I’m not the best at Jason Witten trust falls ;)”

and

“Not hurtin’ today, like some of y’all thought I would be! Our TE isn’t as tough as he looks... That or I’m WAY tougher than I look. ;)”

Natually, there quickly was a campaign to bring Kellerman’s account back and by Monday afternoon, it had been recreated. Now, though, her tweets are protected. And she has picked up a boatload of followers.

By  |  06:19 AM ET, 11/28/2011

Categories:  The Early Lead

 
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