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The Early Lead
Posted at 03:12 PM ET, 06/25/2012

Jerry Sandusky: What happens next for him, Penn State and victims?

Now that Jerry Sandusky has been convicted on 45 counts of child sexual abuse, what happens next?

The former Penn State defensive coordinator, for now, remains in isolation in the Centre County (Pa.) Correctional Facility on suicide watch as he awaits a psychological evaluation.

“He's anxious to be able to move around,” Karl Rominger, one of his lawyers, told the Patriot-News. “His exact quote to me: ‘I don’t think I’m suicidal. I’m dealing with this, but if I have to sit around in this cell for a few more days, I am going to go nutty.’ “

Sandusky is expected to be evaluated this week and, until then,. “has no interaction with other inmates,” Denise Ebell, the acting prison administrator, said Sunday. “Most of the time he’ll just sit on his bunk, and he basically looks at the wall or at the officer [guarding his cell].”


Jerry Sandusky’s booking photo. (HO / AFP / Getty Images)
Sandusky, 68, is to be sentenced within 90 days and his lawyers say they will appeal the verdict. Rominger told the Patriot-News that one part of the appeal will center on a document dump prosecutors made as the trial date neared. “Within the month of May, you’ll see we received 1,700 pages of discovery,” he said. “Plus 700 in the couple of days [leading up to trial].

“There's no reason the government couldn’t have presented it a lot sooner. One of the things were piles of police reports, people they spoke to who denied being victims. How are we supposed to run all those people down and talk to them?”

That may be the least of the work that lies ahead for Rominger and Joe Amendola, Sandusky’s other lawyer. There could be further criminal charges in what the Pennsylvania attorney general’s office said is “an active and ongoing” investigation.

And then there are the civil suits. One, which filed in December and placed on hold until after criminal issues were resolved, is “ready to go,” according to a lawyer for Travis Weaver. Jeff Anderson and Marci Hamilton represent Weaver, who filed suit against Sandusky, Penn State and The Second Mile, the children’s charity Sandusky founded. He claims he was abused over 100 times by Sandusky.

Penn State sought to head off civil suits Friday night, saying in a statement that “the university wants to provide a forum where the university can privately, expeditiously and fairly address the victims' concerns and compensate them for claims relating to the university.”

Sandusky may be behind bars and facing as many as 442 years in prison, but this is not over.

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More coverage

Sandusky found guilty

Achenblog: Lasting impressions from Sandusky trial

The original grand jury report

A second grand jury presentment

Timeline: How the scandal unfolded

Early Lead: Sandusky tells Bob Costas he showered with boys but denies abuse

By  |  03:12 PM ET, 06/25/2012

 
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