Mack Brown to step down as Texas football coach

December 14, 2013

(AP Photo/Eric Gay)

After days of uncertainty over his future, Mack Brown announced Saturday night that he will step down as football coach at Texas. He will coach the Longhorns against Oregon in the Alamo Bowl on Dec. 30.

“The program is again being pulled in different directions, and I think the time is right for a change,” Brown said in a university-issued news release. “I love The University of Texas, all of its supporters, the great fans and everyone that played and coached here. I can’t thank DeLoss Dodds enough for bringing our family here, and Bill Powers and the administration for supporting us at a place where I have made lifelong friendships. It is the best coaching job and the premier football program in America. I sincerely want it to get back to the top and that’s why I am stepping down after the bowl game. I hope with some new energy, we can get this thing rolling again.”

Brown went 158-47 in 16 seasons at Texas, winning the 2005 BCS title and losing in the title game in 2009. The Longhorns won at least 10 games in nine straight seasons from 2001 to 2009 but had records of 5-7, 8-5, 9-4 and 8-4 in the seasons that followed. Brown had been criticized for passing up on heralded recruits such as Johnny Manziel and Robert Griffin III, the last two Heisman Trophy winners, as well as Jameis Winson, the presumptive front-runner this season.

“We appreciate everything Mack has done for The University of Texas,” Texas AD Steve Patterson said in the statement. “He’s been a tremendous coach, mentor, leader and ambassador for our university and our student-athletes. He is truly a college football legend. I’ve had a number of talks with him recently, and he has always said he wanted what was best for The University of Texas. I know this decision weighed heavily on him, and today he told us he’s ready to move forward.”

Overall, Brown has a 238-116-1 record in 29 seasons as a coach at Tulane, North Carolina and Texas.

After spending the first 17 years of his Post career writing and editing, Matt and the printed paper had an amicable divorce in 2014. He's now blogging and editing for the Early Lead and the Post's other Web-based products.
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