Hometown paper celebrates S.C. GOPers

Yesterday all five House Republicans from South Carolina stonewalled House Speaker John Boehner’s debt proposal, a development that prompted much sneering in the halls of the Capitol.

Not a word of that backlash, however, wound up in the top news story in The State, South Carolina’s largest newspaper. The story read more like a hometown celebration rather than a balanced look at Thursday’s events. Some highlights:

*Celebrating backbone in the lede:

The five Republican House members from South Carolina held firm Thursday night against relentless pressure from Speaker John Boehner to vote for his bill to increase the federal debt ceiling.

*First “Remarkable show of defiance”:

The remarkable show of defiance by the state’s lawmakers against their party’s House leaders played a central role in forcing Boehner to pull the debt-limit measure at 10:30 p.m. after they and other foes endured hours of arm-twisting in personal meetings at the Capitol.

*Second “Remarkable show of defiance”

The refusal by the five S.C. GOP lawmakers – including freshman Reps. Tim Scott, Mick Mulvaney, Jeff Duncan and Trey Gowdy – was a remarkable show of public defiance against their party’s House leaders on a high-profile vote with the nation watching.

*Hero worship unfolds:

As day stretched into evening, Rep. Jeff Duncan of Laurens resisted increasingly urgent appeals from Boehner’s team to switch sides and back the legislation to raise the debt limit by $900 billion while imposing $1.2 trillion in immediate spending cuts.

“Jeff is being pushed very hard to vote for the bill,” said Allen Klump, his spokesman.

Rep. Trey Gowdy was also being muscled hard by his congressional bosses.

“A 16-year prosecutor can handle pressure,” said Robert Hughes, Gowdy’s spokesman.

Before defeating incumbent Rep. Bob Inglis in the Upstate’s Republican primary last year, Gowdy was 7th Circuit solicitor in Spartanburg.

*Now for all the critical remarks about the South Carolina delegation:

Erik Wemple writes the Erik Wemple blog, where he reports and opines on media organizations of all sorts.

opinions

Success! Check your inbox for details. You might also like:

Please enter a valid email address

See all newsletters

Comments
Show Comments
Most Read

opinions

Success! Check your inbox for details.

See all newsletters