wpostServer: http://css.washingtonpost.com/wpost

The Post Most: Opinions

direct signup

Today’s Opinions poll

Should the United States fund the service program AmeriCorps? President Obama would increase its budget. Rep. Paul Ryan would eliminate federal funding for the program.

Submit
Next
Review your answers and share
Erik Wemple
On Twitter E-mail |  On Twitter Follow |  On Facebook Fan |  RSS RSS Feed
Posted at 08:21 AM ET, 05/02/2012

Media news derivatives: May 2

In case you missed it---Bryan Fischer of the American Family Association thinks it’s not such a big deal that the Mitt Romney campaign has lost highly experienced and openly gay foreign policy spokesman Richard Grenell. Plenty of other qualified candidates out there, says Fischer.

Also: MPs debate the question of Rupert Murdoch’s “fitness” to run a large company. Why is that so divisive? (Barry Diller has Murdoch’s back, however.)

Elsewhere:

*Is this a gotcha video of Andrea Mitchell, via NewsBusters?

*Andrew Beaujon of Poynter reports that those circulation numbers for The Washington Post don’t look quite as bad as they appear.

* “The Daily Show’s” Jon Stewart rips into the folks who are criticizing President Obama for allegedly politicizing the killing of Osama bin Laden:

*Washington group named Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington (CREW) lobbies the Federal Communications Commission to pull News Corp.’s 27 Fox broadcast licenses based on the company’s phone-hacking scandal. The call comes as a parliamentary committee in Britain declares that Rupert Murdoch is “not fit” to run a major corporation. From the Guardian:

Melanie Sloan, Crew’s director, said that the Murdochs had clearly failed the character test that is embedded within US media law as it is within British. “If they are not passing the character standard under British law, it seems to me that they are not going to meet the character standard in America.”

*Mediaite reports another round of ratings trouble for Erin Burnett.

*BuzzFeed’s Zeke Miller explains how the White House doused media coverage of the president’s trip to Afghanistan. The effort included a request from a White House spokesman to BuzzFeed Editor Ben Smith to take down a tweet of a TOLONews report that the president had landed in Afghanistan.* How did Smith respond?

“Like most news organizations, we will typically defer to the White House’s judgment on true security risks,” Smith said, explaining why BuzzFeed complied with the request. “In this case, we had no original reporting on the subject, and it didn’t seem like right moment to have an abstract argument about the contemporary media ecosystem, though I think it’s getting harder and harder to unring these bells.”

*Update:Original incorrectly said that the spokesman had asked BuzzFeed to take down a retweet.

By  |  08:21 AM ET, 05/02/2012

Tags:  bryan fischer, american family association, richard grenell, mps, rupert murdoch, andrea mitchell, newsbusters, daily show, jon stewart, citizens for responsibility and ethics in washington, buzzfeed, mediaite

 
Read what others are saying
     

    © 2011 The Washington Post Company