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Erik Wemple
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Posted at 08:39 AM ET, 05/24/2012

Media news derivatives: May 24

In case you missed it---Washington Times scrubs some recent columns by Arnaud de Borchgrave from the paper’s Web site . Is that a good move, considering that the paper had announced it was investigating the columnist’s work? Or is that a shadowy and untransparent move?

Also: Just what motivated Fairleigh Dickinson University to do a bigger version of its November 2011 poll that essentially blasted Fox News?

Elsewhere:

*No! The New York Times’ David Carr is reporting on some drastic news relating to the New Orleans Times-Picayune. Sources are indicating that the paper may bag its daily publishing schedule and move to two or three times per week. Staff cuts are also in the offing, according to Carr.

*This is one that strains every notion of credulity, to the point that I’d like to put it in the category of hoax. Wired.com writes that there’s a crusade afoot in the state of New York against anonymous writings on the Internet. The legislation says:

A WEB SITE ADMINISTRATOR UPON REQUEST SHALL REMOVE ANY COMMENTS POSTED ON HIS OR HER WEB SITE BY AN ANONYMOUS POSTER UNLESS SUCH ANONYMOUS POSTER AGREES TO ATTACH HIS OR HER NAME TO THE POST AND CONFIRMS THAT HIS OR HER IP ADDRESS, LEGAL NAME, AND HOME ADDRESS ARE ACCURATE.

Wired says that the measure hasn’t the slightest hope of weathering a constitutional challenge “unless the First Amendment is repealed.”

*Politico’s Dylan Byers takes after Rachel Maddow over talking points on unemployment.

*La Nación, an Argentine newspaper, is wading into database investigations, and loving it.

La Nación DATA comprises 10 people; six from the tech side (a project manager, a trainer, two designers, two IT folks), and four full-time data journalists. It is a small team but the data movement is thriving in the newsroom. Two weeks ago, La Nación created a data producer position to spot and convert useful data that comes in via press releases, emails, or PDFs. There are 8 data producers in different sections of the newsroom, and the plan is to keep adding more.

*Magazine publishers’ comment about the Internet: Meh.

*More on the White House and key federal agencies giving some nice access to filmmakers who were researching the ins and outs of the successful raid on Osama bin Laden’s compound. The Daily Beast writes that the “two people who appear to have gotten the best access last year to this often-classified side of government were Kathryn Bigelow and Mark Boal, the Oscar-winning pair who wrote and directed The Hurt Locker.”

The Beast quotes Lucy Dalglish, executive director for the Reporters Committee for Freedom of the Press, as calling the whole thing “outrageous.” “If these filmmakers got access that trained national security and military reporters did not, then it’s telling the public: ‘We are not going to allow trained journalists to tell this story. If you want to know what happened, go buy a ticket to a movie,’” Dalglish said.

*The Los Angeles Times issues advice to the common individual on how to regard polling data. With caution, that is.

*How did Piers Morgan react to the claim made at Leveson inquiry that he instructed a peer on how to hack phones?

*Go to the 6:00 mark of the video below for a great, sustained frenzy of cable news crosstalk, courtesy of MSNBC’s “The Ed Show.”

By  |  08:39 AM ET, 05/24/2012

Tags:  washington times, arnaud de borchgrave, fairleigh dickinson university, new york times, new orleans times-picayune, wired.com, new york state

 
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