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Erik Wemple
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Posted at 08:29 AM ET, 05/08/2012

Media news derivatives: May 8

In case you missed it---MSNBC explains why, for a second there, it put this chyron before a shot of French President Nicolas Sarkozy: “Prostitute Speaks.”

Also: Following Bill Keller’s criticism of Fox News, one commentator turned the argument against the New York Times, saying that Fox News looks good in comparison with the Times. And I ask: Why pit these two organizations against each other, when they appear to be working on a burgeoning partnership?

Elsewhere:

*Alexis Madrigal attacks what he calls the “myth” that photo galleries/slideshows drive traffic.

If you’re trying to juice page views, your staff will ineluctably be forced to make galleries. Where else can they get a 10x or 20x multiplier on their work? I can guarantee you that will not help you break the kinds of stories or do the kinds of analysis that will keep people coming back. Not only that, but it’s demoralizing to your best people, the ones who want to be out there producing their best work.

*Here’s a notion: We are underestimating just how completely news media have changed over the past decade-plus. Traditional journalistic institutions aren’t just being transformed; that’s mild change. They’re being replaced.

Immense. The range of sites and services nibbling away at journalism is immense.
Steve Yelvington warned us back in 2009 that we were solving the wrong problem: “You’re not competing on the basis of whether you have unique news. You’re competing with the entire world on the basis of the value that consumers get out of your product.”
We haven’t found the right ways to get people to pay for news and media online, but they have. We are crying but they are having a party on the other side of the river with their not-really-reporting and sort-of-journalism and maybe-media.

*Mediaite reports something of a victory for CNN in Friday night ratings.

*Greta Van Susteren says that she’d be game for dumping celebs from the White House Correspondents’ Association dinner. With a condition, that is:

I am game to give Tom Brokaw’s idea a try next year — no more celebrities for our one big social night in Washington (WHCD) — but here is my request: in exchange, how do we get our colleagues in the media’s attention to such issues as genocide in Sudan? does he have ideas? and could he help?

*AP reports that the CIA foiled an al-Qaeda plot to bring down a U.S.-bound airliner with a sophisticated underwear bomb. But the AP didn’t exactly publish the story on its own timeline:

The AP learned about the thwarted plot last week but agreed to White House and CIA requests not to publish it immediately because the sensitive intelligence operation was still under way. Once officials said those concerns were allayed, the AP decided to disclose the plot Monday despite requests from the Obama administration to wait for an official announcement Tuesday.

*Fox News discusses stadiums, campaigns and enthusiasm. But what about policy?

By  |  08:29 AM ET, 05/08/2012

Tags:  ap, greta van susteren, mediaite, cnn, bill keller, atlantic

 
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